IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/wpa/wuwpdc/0408011.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Human Capital Composition, R&D and the Increasing Role of Services

Author

Listed:
  • Tiago Sequeira

    (Univ Beira Interior & Faculdade de Economia, Univ Nova de Lisboa)

  • Ana Balcão Reis

    (Faculdade de Economia, Univ Nova de Lisboa)

Abstract

A growth model with endogenous innovation and accumulation of high-tech and low- tech human capital is developed. The model accounts for a recently established fact about human capital composition, which stated that \the richest countries are investing proportionally less than middle income countries in engineering and technical human capital', due to the consideration of a negative effect of technological development on the accumulation of high-tech human capital. Under this new and reasonable assump- tion, our model also accounts for other previously established stylized facts. Both the evolution of human capital composition and the transition across stages of development are endogenously determined. We relate an increasing R&D activity and a negative relationship between income and the ratio of high to low-tech human capital, both present in developed countries, to the transition to a services economy. Although all growth rates are optimal, we observe under-allocation of high-tech human capital to industry.

Suggested Citation

  • Tiago Sequeira & Ana Balcão Reis, 2004. "Human Capital Composition, R&D and the Increasing Role of Services," Development and Comp Systems 0408011, EconWPA.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpdc:0408011
    Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 50
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://econwpa.ub.uni-muenchen.de/econ-wp/dev/papers/0408/0408011.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Funke, Michael & Strulik, Holger, 2000. "On endogenous growth with physical capital, human capital and product variety," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 44(3), pages 491-515, March.
    2. N. F. R. Crafts & C. K. Harley, 1992. "Output growth and the British industrial revolution: a restatement of the Crafts-Harley view," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 45(4), pages 703-730, November.
    3. Baumol, William J, 1972. "Macroeconomics of Unbalanced Growth: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 62(1), pages 150-150, March.
    4. Piyabha Kongsamut & Sergio Rebelo & Danyang Xie, 2001. "Beyond Balanced Growth," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 68(4), pages 869-882.
    5. Charles I. Jones, 1995. "Time Series Tests of Endogenous Growth Models," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(2), pages 495-525.
    6. Jones, Charles I & Williams, John C, 2000. "Too Much of a Good Thing? The Economics of Investment in R&D," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 5(1), pages 65-85, March.
    7. William Easterly & Ross Levine, 1997. "Africa's Growth Tragedy: Policies and Ethnic Divisions," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(4), pages 1203-1250.
    8. Helpman, Elhanan & Rangel, Antonio, 1999. "Adjusting to a New Technology: Experience and Training," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 4(4), pages 359-383, December.
    9. Daron Acemoglu & Fabrizio Zilibotti, 2001. "Productivity Differences," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(2), pages 563-606.
    10. Oded Galor & Omer Moav, 2000. "Ability-Biased Technological Transition, Wage Inequality, and Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(2), pages 469-497.
    11. Katz, Lawrence F. & Autor, David H., 1999. "Changes in the wage structure and earnings inequality," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 26, pages 1463-1555 Elsevier.
    12. Neves Sequeira Tiago, 2003. "High-Tech Human Capital: Do the Richest Countries Invest the Most?," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 3(1), pages 1-28, September.
    13. Robert J. Barro, 1991. "Economic Growth in a Cross Section of Countries," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 407-443.
    14. Ricardo J. Caballero & Adam B. Jaffe, 1993. "How High are the Giants' Shoulders: An Empirical Assessment of Knowledge Spillovers and Creative Destruction in a Model of Economic Growth," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1993, Volume 8, pages 15-86 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. del Barrio-Castro, Tomas & Lopez-Bazo, Enrique & Serrano-Domingo, Guadalupe, 2002. "New evidence on international R&D spillovers, human capital and productivity in the OECD," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 41-45, September.
    16. Tiago Neves Sequeira, 2003. "Human Capital Composition, Growth and Development in an R&D Endogenous Growth Model," Macroeconomics 0310015, EconWPA.
    17. Vernon W. Ruttan, 2002. "Can Economic Growth Be Sustained? A Post-Malthusian Perspective," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 28(1), pages 1-12.
    18. Arnold, Lutz G., 1998. "Growth, Welfare, and Trade in an Integrated Model of Human-Capital Accumulation and Research," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 81-105, January.
    19. Crafts, N. F. R., 1995. "Exogenous or Endogenous Growth? The Industrial Revolution Reconsidered," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 55(04), pages 745-772, December.
    20. Galor, Oded & Moav, Omer, 1998. "Ability Biased Technological Transition, Wage Inequality and Growth," CEPR Discussion Papers 1972, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    21. Huw Lloyd-Ellis, 1999. "Endogenous Technological Change and Wage Inequality," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(1), pages 47-77, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Manuel A. Gómez, 2012. "Equilibrium Dynamics Of An Endogenous Growth Model With An Erosion Effect And Duplication In R&D," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 80(6), pages 700-717, December.
    2. Simone Marsiglio & Alberto Ansuategi & Maria Carmen Gallastegui, 2016. "The Environmental Kuznets Curve and the Structural Change Hypothesis," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 63(2), pages 265-288, February.
    3. Tiago Neves Sequeira, 2008. "Transitional Dynamics Of An Endogenous Growth Model With An Erosion Effect," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 76(4), pages 436-452, July.
    4. Bucci, Alberto, 2008. "Population growth in a model of economic growth with human capital accumulation and horizontal R&D," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 1124-1147, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    human capital composition; high-tech human capital; R&D; Development; structural transition;

    JEL classification:

    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpdc:0408011. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (EconWPA). General contact details of provider: http://econwpa.repec.org .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.