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Sectoral Shift, Wealth Distribution, and Development

  • Kazuhiro Yuki

    (Faculty of Economics, Kyoto University)

There are two phenomena widely observed when an economy departs from an underdeveloped state and starts rapid economic growth. One is the shift of production, employment, and consumption from the traditional sector to the modern sector, and the other is a large increase in educational levels of its population. The question is why some economies have succeeded in such ’structural change’, but others do not. In order to examine the question, an overlapping generations model that explicitly takes into account the sectoral change and human capital accumulation as sources of development is constructed and analyzed.

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File URL: http://econwpa.repec.org/eps/dev/papers/0509/0509001.pdf
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Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Development and Comp Systems with number 0509001.

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Length: 35 pages
Date of creation: 02 Sep 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpdc:0509001
Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 35
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://econwpa.repec.org

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