IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this paper

Forecasting Regional Employment in Germany by Means of Neural Networks and Genetic Algorithms

Listed author(s):
  • Roberto Patuelli

    (Vrije Universiteit)

  • Simonetta Longhi

    (University of Essex)

  • Aura Reggiani

    (University of Bologna)

  • Peter Nijkamp

    (Vrije Universiteit)

The aim of this paper is to develop and apply Neural Network (NN) models in order to forecast regional employment patterns in Germany. NNs are statistical tools based on learning algorithms with a distribution over a large amount of quantitative data. NNs are increasingly deployed in the social sciences as a useful technique for interpolating data when a clear specification of the functional relationship between dependent and independent variables is not available. In addition to traditional NN models, a further set of NN models will be developed in this paper, incorporating Genetic Algorithm (GA) techniques in order to detect the networks’ structure. GAs are computer-aided optimization tools that imitate natural biological evolution in order to find the solution that best fits the given case. Our experiments employ a data set consisting of a panel of 439 districts distributed over the former West and East Germany,. The West and East data sets have different time horizons, as employment information by district is available from 1987 and 1993 for West and East Germany, respectively. Separate West and East models are tested, before carrying out a unified experiment on the full data set for Germany. The above models are then evaluated by means of several statistical indicators, in order to test their ability to provide out- of-sample forecasts. A comparison between traditional and GAenhanced models is ultimately proposed. The results show that the West and East NN models perform with different degrees of precision, because of the different data sets’ time horizons.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://econwpa.repec.org/eps/comp/papers/0511/0511002.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Computational Economics with number 0511002.

as
in new window

Length: 23 pages
Date of creation: 08 Nov 2005
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpco:0511002
Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 23
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://econwpa.repec.org

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as
in new window

  1. John Cooper, 1999. "Artificial neural networks versus multivariate statistics: An application from economics," Journal of Applied Statistics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(8), pages 909-921.
  2. Reggiani, Aura & Nijkamp, Peter & Sabella, Enrico, 2001. "New advances in spatial network modelling: Towards evolutionary algorithms," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 128(2), pages 385-401, January.
  3. James H. Stock & Mark W. Watson, 1998. "A Comparison of Linear and Nonlinear Univariate Models for Forecasting Macroeconomic Time Series," NBER Working Papers 6607, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Lutz Bellmann & Uwe Blien, 2001. "Wage Curve Analyses of Establishment Data from Western Germany," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 54(4), pages 851-863, July.
  5. Longhi, Simonetta & Nijkamp, Peter & Reggiani, Aura & Blien, Uwe, 2002. "Forecasting regional labour markets in Germany: an evaluation of the performance of neural network analysis," ERSA conference papers ersa02p117, European Regional Science Association.
  6. Nag, Ashok K & Mitra, Amit, 2002. "Forecasting Daily Foreign Exchange Rates Using Genetically Optimized Neural Networks," Journal of Forecasting, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(7), pages 501-511, November.
  7. Swanson, Norman R. & White, Halbert, 1997. "Forecasting economic time series using flexible versus fixed specification and linear versus nonlinear econometric models," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 439-461, December.
  8. Norman R. Swanson & Halbert White, 1997. "A Model Selection Approach To Real-Time Macroeconomic Forecasting Using Linear Models And Artificial Neural Networks," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(4), pages 540-550, November.
  9. Manfred M. Fischer & Yee Leung, 1998. "A genetic-algorithms based evolutionary computational neural network for modelling spatial interaction data," ERSA conference papers ersa98p478, European Regional Science Association.
  10. Baker, Bruce D. & Richards, Craig E., 1999. "A comparison of conventional linear regression methods and neural networks for forecasting educational spending," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 405-415, October.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpco:0511002. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (EconWPA)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.