IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this paper

Local Public Service Provision and Spatial Inequality in Chinese Cities

Listed author(s):
  • Weizeng Sun
  • Siqi Zheng
  • Yuming Fu

    ()

We study spatial inequality in access to local public services between low-income and high-income households in Chinese cities. We examine the extent to which such inequality is exacerbated by residential sorting with respect to household income that makes neighborhoods with better access to scarce public-service resources more exclusive. Evidence based on cross-city regression analysis indicates increased spatial inequality due to income sorting where public-service resources are scarcer and income sorting is easier. Thus additional provision of public-service resources is found to benefit low-income households more than high-income households as a result of reduced spatial inequality. The housing supply conditions that facilitate income sorting are found to help the rich at the expanse of the poor in taking advantage of local public service resources.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www-sre.wu.ac.at/ersa/ersaconfs/ersa16/Paper799_YumingFu.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by European Regional Science Association in its series ERSA conference papers with number ersa16p799.

as
in new window

Length:
Date of creation: Dec 2016
Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa16p799
Contact details of provider: Postal:
Welthandelsplatz 1, 1020 Vienna, Austria

Web page: http://www.ersa.org

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as
in new window


  1. Charles M. Tiebout, 1956. "A Pure Theory of Local Expenditures," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 64, pages 416-416.
  2. Edward L. Glaeser & Bruce Sacerdote & José A. Scheinkman, 1996. "Crime and Social Interactions," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 111(2), pages 507-548.
  3. de Bartolome, Charles A.M. & Ross, Stephen L., 2007. "Community income distributions in a metropolitan area," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(3), pages 496-518, May.
  4. Bayer, Patrick & McMillan, Robert, 2012. "Tiebout sorting and neighborhood stratification," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(11), pages 1129-1143.
  5. Banzhaf, H. Spencer & Walsh, Randall P., 2013. "Segregation and Tiebout sorting: The link between place-based investments and neighborhood tipping," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 83-98.
  6. Kremer, M & Maskin, E, 1996. "Wage Inequality and Segregation by Skill," Working papers 96-23, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  7. Edward L. Glaeser & Matthew G. Resseger & Kristina Tobio, 2008. "Urban Inequality," NBER Working Papers 14419, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Patrick Bayer & Stephen L. Ross & Giorgio Topa, 2008. "Place of Work and Place of Residence: Informal Hiring Networks and Labor Market Outcomes," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 116(6), pages 1150-1196, December.
  9. Eric A. Hanushek & Kuzey Yilmaz, 2007. "Schools and Location: Tiebout, Alonso, and Government Policy," NBER Working Papers 12960, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Roback, Jennifer, 1982. "Wages, Rents, and the Quality of Life," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(6), pages 1257-1278, December.
  11. Albert Saiz, 2010. "The Geographic Determinants of Housing Supply," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 125(3), pages 1253-1296.
  12. Miles Corak, 2013. "Income Inequality, Equality of Opportunity, and Intergenerational Mobility," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 27(3), pages 79-102, Summer.
  13. Fu, Yuming & Gabriel, Stuart A., 2012. "Labor migration, human capital agglomeration and regional development in China," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 473-484.
  14. Glaeser, Edward L & Mare, David C, 2001. "Cities and Skills," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 19(2), pages 316-342, April.
  15. Davidoff, Thomas, 2005. "Income sorting: Measurement and decomposition," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 289-303, September.
  16. Christopher H. Wheeler, 2008. "Urban decentralization and income inequality: is sprawl associated with rising income segregation across neighborhoods?," Regional Economic Development, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Oct, pages 41-57.
  17. Edward L. Glaeser & David Laibson & Bruce Sacerdote, 2002. "An Economic Approach to Social Capital," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(483), pages 437-458, November.
  18. Eliza Lee & Ian Thynne & Baogang He, 2011. "Civic engagement through participatory budgeting in China: Three different logics at work," Public Administration & Development, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 31(2), pages 122-133, May.
  19. Gregory C. Chow & Linlin Niu, 2015. "Housing Prices in Urban China as Determined by Demand and Supply," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(1), pages 1-16, February.
  20. Siqi Zheng & Yuming Fu & Hongyu Liu, 2009. "Demand for Urban Quality of Living in China: Evolution in Compensating Land-Rent and Wage-Rate Differentials," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 38(3), pages 194-213, April.
  21. Sun, Cong & Kahn, Matthew E. & Zheng, Siqi, 2017. "Self-protection investment exacerbates air pollution exposure inequality in urban China," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 131(C), pages 468-474.
  22. Raj Chetty & Nathaniel Hendren & Patrick Kline & Emmanuel Saez, 2014. "Where is the land of Opportunity? The Geography of Intergenerational Mobility in the United States," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 129(4), pages 1553-1623.
  23. repec:hrv:faseco:30750027 is not listed on IDEAS
  24. Eric A. Hanushek & Kuzey Yilmaz, 2013. "Schools and Location: Tiebout, Alonso, and Governmental Finance Policy," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 15(6), pages 829-855, December.
  25. Anping Chen & Marlon Boarnet & Mark Partridge & Siqi Zheng & Weizeng Sun & Rui Wang, 2014. "Land Supply And Capitalization Of Public Goods In Housing Prices: Evidence From Beijing," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(4), pages 550-568, September.
  26. H. Spencer Banzhaf & Randall P. Walsh, 2008. "Do People Vote with Their Feet? An Empirical Test of Tiebout," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(3), pages 843-863, June.
  27. Zheng, Siqi & Fu, Yuming & Liu, Hongyu, 2006. "Housing-choice hindrances and urban spatial structure: Evidence from matched location and location-preference data in Chinese cities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(3), pages 535-557, November.
  28. Glaeser, Edward L. & Kahn, Matthew E. & Rappaport, Jordan, 2008. "Why do the poor live in cities The role of public transportation," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 1-24, January.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa16p799. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Gunther Maier)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.