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Integration and Labour Markets in European Border regions

  • Annekatrin Niebuhr

    ()

  • Silvia Stiller

    ()

Border regions are likely to play a critical role within the special dynamics initiated by the enlargement of the EU. This paper deals with the effects of integration on labour market conditions in border regions. Within the framework of different theoretical approaches the effects of integration on location conditions and labour markets in border regions are analysed. Furthermore, we investigate empirically the degree of labour market integration in European border regions. Measures of spatial association are applied as indicators for the intensity of integration among neighbouring labour markets. The results of an analysis of per capita income and unemployment for the period 1995 to 2000 point at a measurable spatial segmentation of labour markets even among highly integrated EU15 countries. On average, border regions in the EU are characterised by lower degree of labour market integration than non-border areas due to significant border impediments that hamper equilibrating forces between labour markets on both sides of national frontiers. JEL classification: F22, J61, R23 Keywords: European Integration, Labour Market Disparities, Border Regions, Spatial Dependence

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Paper provided by European Regional Science Association in its series ERSA conference papers with number ersa04p29.

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Date of creation: Aug 2004
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Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa04p29
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  1. Deardorff, A.V., 1995. "Determinants of Bilateral Trade : Does Gravity Work in a Neoclassical World?," Papers 95-05, Michigan - Center for Research on Economic & Social Theory.
  2. Niebuhr, Annekatrin & Stiller, Silvia, 2002. "Integration effects in border regions : a survey of economic theory and empirical studies," HWWA Discussion Papers 179, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWA).
  3. Paolo Epifani & Gino Gancia, 2002. "Geography, Migrations and Equilibrium Unemployment," KITeS Working Papers 128, KITeS, Centre for Knowledge, Internationalization and Technology Studies, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy, revised Jul 2001.
  4. Diego Puga, 1999. "Unemployment clusters across Europe's regions and countries," Working Papers dpuga-99-03, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
  5. Niebuhr, Annekatrin & Stiller, Silvia, 2004. "Integration and Labour Markets in European Border Regions," HWWA Discussion Papers 284, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWA).
  6. Enrique Lopez Bazo & Esther Vaya Valcarce & Antonio Jose Mora & Jordi Surinach Caralt, 1997. "Regional economic dynamics and convergence in the european union," Working Papers in Economics 12, Universitat de Barcelona. Espai de Recerca en Economia.
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  8. Fingleton, B & McCombie, J S L, 1998. "Increasing Returns and Economic Growth: Some Evidence for Manufacturing from the European Union Regions," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 50(1), pages 89-105, January.
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  12. Jarko Fidrmuc & Jan Fidrmuc, 2000. "Disintegration and Trade," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 353, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  13. Puga, Diego, 1999. "The rise and fall of regional inequalities," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 303-334, February.
  14. Straubhaar, Thomas, 2000. "Internationale Migration - Gehen oder Bleiben : wieso gehen wenige und bleiben die meisten?," HWWA Discussion Papers 111, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWA).
  15. Peter Spencer, 2001. "E-money: Will it Take Off?," World Economics, World Economics, Economic & Financial Publishing, 1 Ivory Square, Plantation Wharf, London, United Kingdom, SW11 3UE, vol. 2(1), pages 121-136, January.
  16. Bode, Eckhardt & Krieger-Boden, Christiane & Lammers, Konrad, 1994. "Cross-border activities, taxation and the European single market," Open Access Publications from Kiel Institute for the World Economy 799, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
  17. J. Paul Elhorst, 2003. "The Mystery of Regional Unemployment Differentials: Theoretical and Empirical Explanations," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(5), pages 709-748, December.
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