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Not Separate, Not Equal: Poverty and Inequality in Post-Apartheid South Africa

  • Johannes G. Hoogeveen
  • Berk Özler

    ()

As South Africa conducts a review of the first ten years of its new democracy, the question remains as to whether the economic inequalities of the apartheid era are beginning to fade. Using new, comparable consumption aggregates for 1995 and 2000, this paper finds that real per capita household expenditures declined for those at the bottom end of the expenditure distribution during this period of low GDP growth. As a result, poverty, especially extreme poverty, increased. Inequality also increased, mainly due to a jump in inequality among the African population. Even among subgroups of the population that experienced healthy consumption growth, such as the Coloureds, the rate of poverty reduction was low because the distributional shifts were not pro-poor.

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Paper provided by William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan in its series William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series with number wp739.

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Length: pages
Date of creation: 01 Jan 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wdi:papers:2005-739
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