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The Other Side of the Moon: The Data Problem in Analyzing Growth Determinants

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  • Jan Hanousek

    ()

  • Dana Hajkova

    ()

  • Randall K. Filer

    ()

Abstract

Replication of two recent studies of growth determinants shows that results are sensitive to the choice of data from which growth rates are calculated, especially with respect to whether economic convergence has occurred. Previous warnings against using data that has been adjusted to increase cross-country comparability to study within-country patterns over time (growth rates) have been largely ignored at the cost of possibly contaminating the conclusions.

Suggested Citation

  • Jan Hanousek & Dana Hajkova & Randall K. Filer, 2004. "The Other Side of the Moon: The Data Problem in Analyzing Growth Determinants," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 2004-682, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  • Handle: RePEc:wdi:papers:2004-682
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    File URL: http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/40068/3/wp682.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Jerik Hanushek & Dennis Kimko, 2006. "Schooling, Labor-force Quality, and the Growth of Nations," Educational Studies, Higher School of Economics, issue 1, pages 154-193.
    7. World Bank, 2000. "World Development Indicators 2000," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13828, June.
    8. Pantelis Kalaitzidakis & Theofanis P. Mamuneas & Thanasis Stengos, 2000. "A non-linear sensitivity analysis of cross-country growth regressions," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 33(3), pages 604-617, August.
    9. Nazrul Islam, 2003. "What have We Learnt from the Convergence Debate?," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(3), pages 309-362, July.
    10. Andrea Brandolini & Anthony B. Atkinson, 2001. "Promise and Pitfalls in the Use of "Secondary" Data-Sets: Income Inequality in OECD Countries As a Case Study," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(3), pages 771-799, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Eric A. Hanushek & Ludger Woessmann, 2008. "The Role of Cognitive Skills in Economic Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 46(3), pages 607-668, September.
    2. N. Gobbin & G. Rayp, 2004. "Income Inequality Data in Growth Empirics: From Cross-Sections to Time Series," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 04/252, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Growth; Measurement; Developing Economies;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C82 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Macroeconomic Data; Data Access
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence

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