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Are the Penn World Tables data on government consumption and investment being misused?

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  • Knowles, Stephen

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  • Knowles, Stephen, 2001. "Are the Penn World Tables data on government consumption and investment being misused?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 293-298, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:71:y:2001:i:2:p:293-298
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    1. Jonathan Temple & Paul A. Johnson, 1998. "Social Capability and Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 113(3), pages 965-990.
    2. Knowles, Stephen & Owen, P. Dorian, 1995. "Health capital and cross-country variation in income per capita in the Mankiw-Romer-Weil model," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 99-106, April.
    3. Robert J. Barro, 1991. "Economic Growth in a Cross Section of Countries," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 407-443.
    4. Knowles, Stephen & Owen, P Dorian, 1997. "Education and Health in an Effective-Labour Empirical Growth Model," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 73(223), pages 314-328, December.
    5. N. Gregory Mankiw & David Romer & David N. Weil, 1992. "A Contribution to the Empirics of Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(2), pages 407-437.
    6. Ram, Rati, 1986. "Government Size and Economic Growth: A New Framework and Some Evidencefrom Cross-Section and Time-Series Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(1), pages 191-203, March.
    7. Susan M. Collins & Barry P. Bosworth, 1996. "Economic Growth in East Asia: Accumulation versus Assimilation," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 27(2), pages 135-204.
    8. Gemmell, Norman, 1996. "Evaluating the Impacts of Human Capital Stocks and Accumulation on Economic Growth: Some New Evidence," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 58(1), pages 9-28, February.
    9. Stephen Knowles & Paula K. Lorgelly, 2002. "Are educational gender gaps a brake on economic development? Some cross-country empirical evidence," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 54(1), pages 118-149, January.
    10. Gemmell, Norman, 1995. "Endogenous Growth, the Solow Model and Human Capital," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 28(2-3), pages 169-183.
    11. Barro, Robert J. & Lee, Jong-Wha, 1994. "Sources of economic growth," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 1-46, June.
    12. Jonathan R. W. Temple, 1998. "Robustness tests of the augmented Solow model," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(4), pages 361-375.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hanousek, Jan & Hajkova, Dana & Filer, Randall K., 2008. "A rise by any other name? Sensitivity of growth regressions to data source," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 1188-1206, September.
    2. Kevin S. Nell & Maria M. De Mello, 2015. "Testing Capital Accumulation-Driven Growth Models in a Multiple-Regime Framework: Evidence from South Africa," CEF.UP Working Papers 1501, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
    3. Jan Hanousek & Dana Hajkova & Randall K. Filer, 2004. "The Mirage of Convergence: Why Poor Countries May Only Seem to Be Closing the Income Gap," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp222, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    4. Guerriero, Marta & Sen, Kunal, 2012. "What Determines the Share of Labour in National Income? A Cross-Country Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 6643, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Shimeles Abebe, 2010. "Working Paper 122 - Welfare Analysis Using Data from the International Comparison Program for Africa," Working Paper Series 259, African Development Bank.
    6. Matthew Lowe & Chris Papageorgiou & Fidel Perez-Sebastian, 2012. "The Public and Private MPK," DEGIT Conference Papers c017_021, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
    7. Jan Hanousek & Dana Hajkova & Randall K. Filer, 2004. "The Other Side of the Moon: The Data Problem in Analyzing Growth Determinants," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 2004-682, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    8. Rob Luginbuhl & Siem Jan Koopman, 2003. "Convergence in European GDP Series," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 03-031/4, Tinbergen Institute.
    9. Rob Luginbuhl & Siem Jan Koopman, 2004. "Convergence in European GDP series: a multivariate common converging trend-cycle decomposition," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(5), pages 611-636.

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