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Investment, Efficiency, and Credit Rationing: Evidence from Hungarian Panel Data

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  • Mathilde Maurel

Abstract

Relying upon a rich and unique panel of Hungarian firms over 7 years, from 1992 up to 1998, this paper estimates simultaneously TFP, Total Factor Productivity, identified as efficiency, and the parameters of a model where investment depends upon internal funds, wages, and sales, as in Prasnikar J. and Svejnar J. (2000). It shows that while real investment is higher in foreign firms, the improvement in efficiency due to investment is significantly higher in Hungarian domestic firms. We test the possibility that this higher than average foreign investment may exacerbate other firms credit constraints by crowding them out of domestic capital markets. Of course one must control for that foreign firms may simply be more profitable and have access to more collateral, hence be a better investment for lending institutions. All firms (foreign, private and domestically owned, and State-owned) are credit rationed, including foreign firms. State-owned firms do not have an investment behaviour compatible with profit maximisation, a result which emphasises the soft budget constraint persistence (but not through the providing with soft credit). For these firms, wages increase together with investment.

Suggested Citation

  • Mathilde Maurel, 2001. "Investment, Efficiency, and Credit Rationing: Evidence from Hungarian Panel Data," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 403, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  • Handle: RePEc:wdi:papers:2001-403
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    File URL: http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/39787/3/wp403.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gabor Korosi & Laszlo Halpern, 2000. "Efficiency and Market Share in Hungarian Corporate Sector," IEHAS Discussion Papers 0009, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    2. László Halpern & Gábor Körösi, 2001. "Efficiency and market share in the Hungarian corporate sector," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 9(3), pages 559-592, November.
    3. Lubomír Lízal & Jan Svejnar, 2002. "Investment, Credit Rationing, And The Soft Budget Constraint: Evidence From Czech Panel Data," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(2), pages 353-370, May.
    4. Saul Estrin & Jozef Konings & Zbigniew Zolkiewski & Manuela Angelucci, 2001. "The Effect of Ownership and Competitive Pressure on Firm Performance in Transition Countries. Micro Evidence from Bulgaria, Romania and Poland," LICOS Discussion Papers 10401, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
    5. Steven M. Fazzari & R. Glenn Hubbard & Bruce C. Petersen, 1988. "Financing Constraints and Corporate Investment," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 19(1), pages 141-206.
    6. R. Glenn Hubbard, 1998. "Capital-Market Imperfections and Investment," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(1), pages 193-225, March.
    7. Sophie Brana & Mathilde Maurel & Jérôme Sgard, 1999. "Enterprise Adjustment and the Role of Bank Credit in Russia: Evidence from a 420 Firms Qualitative Survey," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 41(4), pages 47-69, December.
    8. Cull, Robert & Xu, Lixin Colin, 2000. "Bureaucrats, State Banks, and the Efficiency of Credit Allocation: The Experience of Chinese State-Owned Enterprises," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 1-31, March.
    9. Grosfeld, Irena & Tressel, Thierry, 2001. "Competition, Corporate Governance: Substitutes or Complements? Evidence from the Warsaw Stock Exchange," CEPR Discussion Papers 2888, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    10. Steven N. Kaplan & Luigi Zingales, 1997. "Do Investment-Cash Flow Sensitivities Provide Useful Measures of Financing Constraints?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(1), pages 169-215.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Butler, Alexander W. & Cornaggia, Jess, 2011. "Does access to external finance improve productivity? Evidence from a natural experiment," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(1), pages 184-203, January.
    2. Ichiro Iwasaki & Satoshi Mizobata, 2017. "Post-Privatization Ownership and Firm Performance: A Large Meta-Analysis of the Transition Literature," KIER Working Papers 966, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
    3. Raushan Bokusheva & Irina Bezlepkina & Alfons Oude Lansink, 2009. "Exploring Farm Investment Behaviour in Transition: The Case of Russian Agriculture," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(2), pages 436-464.
    4. Gatti, Roberta & Love, Inessa, 2006. "Does access to credit improve productivity ? Evidence from Bulgarian firms," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3921, The World Bank.
    5. Zinych, Nataliya & Odening, Martin, 2009. "How Costly are (Agricultural) Investments during Economic Transition? A Critical Literature Appraisal," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 50319, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    6. Vlad Ivanenko, 2001. "Testing Russia's Virtual Economy," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 428, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Investment; credit rationing; soft budget constraint; ownership; transition to a market economy; Hungary;

    JEL classification:

    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity
    • G32 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Financing Policy; Financial Risk and Risk Management; Capital and Ownership Structure; Value of Firms; Goodwill
    • P21 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Planning, Coordination, and Reform
    • D21 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Theory
    • D92 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Intertemporal Firm Choice, Investment, Capacity, and Financing

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