IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/wdi/papers/2000-333.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Efficiency and Market Share in Hungarian Corporate Sector

Author

Listed:
  • Laszlo Halpern
  • Gabor Korosi

Abstract

One of the major tasks facing a transition economy is to create the competitive environment of a properly functioning market economy. It is widely believed that competition has a positive effect on efficiency, but the theoretical and empirical support is quite scarce. The objective of this paper is to investigate the link between competition and efficiency for the Hungarian corporate sector during various phases of the transition process. We employ frontier production functions for exploring differences among groups of firms, and for identifying the typical adjustment process of each group separately throughout the transition period until 1997. Groups are defined according to industries, size, and ownership. The estimated production functions indicate a gradual improvement in efficiency and a shift from decreasing to increasing returns to scale due to a growing share of small firms entering higher returns regimes. Market share can be explained by the degree of internal and external competition and by the efficiency of the firm. Transitional recession in 1990-1 was followed by a fast consolidation period, with rapidly increasing firm level efficiency and improving returns to scale. This consolidation period ended in 1994-5, after that mean firm level efficiency only changed slowly. Massive investments largely increased the market share of the better performing firms and sectors, resulting in rapid economic growth. However, this economic growth may become vulnerable if productive efficiency fails to improve faster.

Suggested Citation

  • Laszlo Halpern & Gabor Korosi, 2000. "Efficiency and Market Share in Hungarian Corporate Sector," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 333, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  • Handle: RePEc:wdi:papers:2000-333
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/39717/3/wp333.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Laszlo Halpern & Gabor Korosi, 1998. "Corporate Structure and Performance in Hungary," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 187, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    2. Brada, Josef C & King, Arthur E & Ma, Chia Ying, 1997. "Industrial Economics of the Transition: Determinants of Enterprise Efficiency in Czechoslovakia and Hungary," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 49(1), pages 104-127, January.
    3. Harrison, Ann E., 1994. "Productivity, imperfect competition and trade reform : Theory and evidence," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(1-2), pages 53-73, February.
    4. Hay, Donald A & Liu, Guy S, 1997. "The Efficiency of Firms: What Difference Does Competition Make?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(442), pages 597-617, May.
    5. Aghion, Philippe & Blanchard, Olivier J & Carlin, Wendy, 1994. "The Economics of Enterprise Restructuring in Central and Eastern Europe," CEPR Discussion Papers 1058, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Nickell, Stephen & Nicolitsas, Daphne & Dryden, Neil, 1997. "What makes firms perform well?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(3-5), pages 783-796, April.
    7. Brown, J David & Earle, John S, 2000. "Competition And Firm Performance: Lessons From Russia," CEPR Discussion Papers 2444, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. S Estrin & P Hare, 1992. "Firms in Transition: Modelling Enterprise Adjustment," CEP Discussion Papers dp0089, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    9. Otto, Glenn, 1999. "The Solow Residual for Australia: Technology Shocks or Factor Utilization?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 37(1), pages 136-153, January.
    10. Kalirajan, K. P., 1997. "A measure of economic efficiency using returns to scale," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 56(3), pages 253-257, November.
    11. Aigner, Dennis & Lovell, C. A. Knox & Schmidt, Peter, 1977. "Formulation and estimation of stochastic frontier production function models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 21-37, July.
    12. Konings, Jozef & Repkin, Alexander, 1998. "How Efficient are Firms in Transition Countries? Firm-Level Evidence from Bulgaria and Romania," CEPR Discussion Papers 1839, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Patricia Augier & Olivier Cadot & Marion Dovis, 2013. "Imports and TFP at the firm level: the role of absorptive capacity," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 46(3), pages 956-981, August.
    2. Andrei Medvedev & Alena Zemplinerová, 2005. "Does Competition Improve Performance? Evidence from the Czech Manufacturing Industries," Prague Economic Papers, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2005(4), pages 317-330.
    3. Mathilde Maurel, 2001. "Investment, Efficiency, and Credit Rationing: Evidence from Hungarian Panel Data," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 403, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    4. Gabor Korosi, 2002. "Labour Adjustment and Efficiency in Hungary," Budapest Working Papers on the Labour Market 0204, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    5. Alena Zemplinerova, 2010. "Competition policy and economic analysis: What can we learn from firm and industry data?," CERGE-EI Books, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague, edition 1, number b07, November.
    6. Vasileios A. Vlachos & Dimitris Kalimeris, 2010. "International business spillovers in emerging markets: the Visegrad group," International Journal of Economic Policy in Emerging Economies, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 3(4), pages 330-345.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    firm in transition economy; production functions; efficiency;

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • D21 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Theory
    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wdi:papers:2000-333. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (WDI). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/wdumius.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.