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Voting with their feet ? access to infrastructure and migration in Nepal

Author

Listed:
  • Shilpi, Forhad
  • Sangraula, Prem
  • Li, Yue

Abstract

Using bilateral migration flow data from the 2010 population census of Nepal, this paper provides evidence on the importance of public infrastructure and services in determining migration flows. The empirical specification, based on a generalized nested logit model, corrects for the non-random selection of migrants. The results show that migrants prefer areas that are nearer to paved roads and have better access to electricity. Apart from electricity's impact on income and through income on migration, the econometric results indicate that migrants attach substantial amenity value to access to electricity. These findings have important implications for the placement of basic infrastructure projects and the way benefits from these projects are evaluated.

Suggested Citation

  • Shilpi, Forhad & Sangraula, Prem & Li, Yue, 2014. "Voting with their feet ? access to infrastructure and migration in Nepal," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7047, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:7047
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Chisari, Omar O. & Miller, Sebastián J., 2016. "Climate Change and Migration: A CGE Analysis for Two Large Urban Regions of Latin America," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 7510, Inter-American Development Bank.

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    Keywords

    Transport Economics Policy&Planning; Population Policies; Economic Theory&Research; Anthropology; Public Sector Economics;

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