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The evolution and impact of bank regulations

Author

Listed:
  • Barth, James R.
  • Caprio, Gerard, Jr.
  • Levine, Ross

Abstract

This paper reassesses what works in banking regulation based on the new World Bank survey (Survey IV) of bank regulation and supervision around world. The paper briefly presents new and official survey information on bank regulations in more than 125 countries, makes comparisons with earlier surveys since 1999, and assesses the relationship between changes in bank regulations and banking system performance. The data suggest that many countries made capital regulations more stringent and granted greater discretionary power to official supervisory agencies over the past 12 years, but most countries have not enhanced the ability and incentives of private investors to monitor banks rigorously -- and several have weakened such private monitoring incentives. Although it is difficult to draw causal inferences from these data, and while there are material cross-country differences in the evolution of regulatory reforms, existing evidence suggests that many countries are making counterproductive changes to their bank regulations by not enhancing the ability and incentives of private investors to scrutinize banks.

Suggested Citation

  • Barth, James R. & Caprio, Gerard, Jr. & Levine, Ross, 2012. "The evolution and impact of bank regulations," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6288, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:6288
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    File URL: http://www-wds.worldbank.org/external/default/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2012/12/11/000158349_20121211100310/Rendered/PDF/wps6288.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Laeven, Luc & Levine, Ross, 2007. "Is there a diversification discount in financial conglomerates?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(2), pages 331-367, August.
    2. Martin Cihak & Sonia Munoz & Ryan Scuzzarella, 2012. "The Bright and the Dark Side of Cross-Border Banking Linkages," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 62(3), pages 200-225, July.
    3. Barth,James R. & Caprio,Gerard & Levine,Ross, 2008. "Rethinking Bank Regulation," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521709309, December.
    4. Barth, James R. & Caprio, Gerard Jr. & Levine, Ross, 2012. "Guardians of Finance: Making Regulators Work for Us," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262017393, January.
    5. Beck, Thorsten & Demirguc-Kunt, Asli & Levine, Ross, 2006. "Bank supervision and corruption in lending," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(8), pages 2131-2163, November.
    6. Cihák, Martin & Schaeck, Klaus, 2010. "How well do aggregate prudential ratios identify banking system problems?," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 6(3), pages 130-144, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Manlagnit, Maria Chelo V., 2015. "Basel regulations and banks’ efficiency: The case of the Philippines," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 72-85.
    2. Buck, Florian & Schliephake, Eva, 2013. "The regulator’s trade-off: Bank supervision vs. minimum capital," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(11), pages 4584-4598.
    3. Hauck, Achim & Vollmer, Uwe, 2013. "Emergency liquidity provision to public banks: Rules versus discretion," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 193-204.
    4. Ghosh, Saibal, 2016. "Political transition and bank performance: How important was the Arab Spring?," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 372-382.
    5. Hans Degryse & Sanja Jakovljević & Steven Ongena, 2015. "A Review of Empirical Research on the Design and Impact of Regulation in the Banking Sector," Annual Review of Financial Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 7(1), pages 423-443, December.
    6. Tabak, Benjamin M. & Fazio, Dimas M. & de O. Paiva, Karine C. & Cajueiro, Daniel O., 2016. "Financial stability and bank supervision," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 18(C), pages 322-327.
    7. repec:eee:riibaf:v:41:y:2017:i:c:p:260-279 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Banks&Banking Reform; Access to Finance; Debt Markets; Public Sector Corruption&Anticorruption Measures; Emerging Markets;

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