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Do community-driven development projects enhance social capital ? evidence from the Philippines


  • Labonne, Julien
  • Chase, Robert S.


This paper explores the social capital impacts of a large-scale, community-driven development project in the Philippines in which communities competed for block grants for infrastructure investment. The analysis uses a unique data set of about 2,100 households collected before the project started (2003) and after one cycle of sub-project implementation (2006) in 66 treatment and 69 matched control communities. Participation in village assemblies, the frequency with which local officials meet with residents and trust towards strangers increased as a result of the project. However, there is a decline in group membership and participation in informal collective action activities. This may have been because households were time-constrained, so that in order to participate in project activities, they needed to temporarily reduce their participation in informal activities. An alternative explanation is that the project improved the efficiency of formal forms of social capital and thus households needed to rely less on informal forms. Finally, the results indicate that, in the short run, the project might have reduced the number of other investments.

Suggested Citation

  • Labonne, Julien & Chase, Robert S., 2008. "Do community-driven development projects enhance social capital ? evidence from the Philippines," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4678, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:4678

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Alesina, Alberto & La Ferrara, Eliana, 2002. "Who trusts others?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(2), pages 207-234, August.
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    3. Barron, Patrick & Diprose, Rachael & Woolcock, Michael, 2007. "Local conflict and development projects in Indonesia : part of the problem or part of a solution ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4212, The World Bank.
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    5. Léandre BASSOLE & Jean-Louis ARCAND, 2006. "Does Community Driven Development Work? Evidence from Senegal," Working Papers 200606, CERDI.
    6. Benjamin A. Olken, 2007. "Monitoring Corruption: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Indonesia," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 115, pages 200-249.
    7. Miguel, Edward & Gertler, Paul & Levine, David I, 2006. "Does Industrialization Build or Destroy Social Networks?," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 54(2), pages 287-317, January.
    8. Woolcock, Michael & Narayan, Deepa, 2000. "Social Capital: Implications for Development Theory, Research, and Policy," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 15(2), pages 225-249, August.
    9. Godquin, Marie & Quisumbing, Agnes R., 2006. "Groups, networks, and social capital in the Philippine communities:," CAPRi working papers 55, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    Cited by:

    1. Reynolds, Joanna & Egan, Matt & Renedo, Alicia & Petticrew, Mark, 2015. "Conceptualising the ‘community’ as a recipient of money – A critical literature review, and implications for health and inequalities," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 143(C), pages 88-97.
    2. World Bank, 2008. "Community-Driven Approaches in Lao PDR : Moving Beyond Service Delivery - Summary Overview," World Bank Other Operational Studies 6163, The World Bank.

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    Housing&Human Habitats; Access to Finance; Social Accountability; Social Capital; Banks&Banking Reform;

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