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Local conflict and development projects in Indonesia : part of the problem or part of a solution ?

Author

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  • Barron, Patrick
  • Diprose, Rachael
  • Woolcock, Michael

Abstract

Drawing on an integrated mixed methods research design, the authors explore the dynamics of the development-conflict nexus in rural Indonesia, and the specific role of development projects in shaping the nature, extent, and trajectories of"everyday"conflicts. They find that projects that give inadequate attention to dispute resolution mechanisms in many cases stimulate local conflict, either through the injection of development resources themselves or less directly by exacerbating preexisting tensions in target communities. But projects that have explicit and accessible procedures for managing disputes arising from the development process are much less likely to lead to violent outcomes. The authors argue that such projects are more successful in addressing project-related conflicts because they establish direct procedures (such as forums, facilitators, and complaints mechanisms) for dealing with tensions as they arise. These direct mechanisms are less successful in addressing broader social tensions elicited by, or external to, the development process, though program mechanisms can ameliorate conflict indirectly through changing norms and networks of interaction.

Suggested Citation

  • Barron, Patrick & Diprose, Rachael & Woolcock, Michael, 2007. "Local conflict and development projects in Indonesia : part of the problem or part of a solution ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4212, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:4212
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. William Easterly & Ross Levine, 1997. "Africa's Growth Tragedy: Policies and Ethnic Divisions," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(4), pages 1203-1250.
    2. Pritchett, Lant & Woolcock, Michael, 2004. "Solutions When the Solution is the Problem: Arraying the Disarray in Development," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 191-212, February.
    3. Vijayendra Rao & Ana Maria Ibanez, 2005. "The Social Impact of Social Funds in Jamaica: A 'Participatory Econometric' Analysis of Targeting, Collective Action, and Participation in Community-Driven Development," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(5), pages 788-838.
    4. Benjamin A. Olken, 2007. "Monitoring Corruption: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Indonesia," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 115, pages 200-249.
    5. Barron, Patrick & Kaiser, Kai & Pradhan, Menno, 2004. "Local conflict in Indonesia : Measuring incidence and identifying patterns," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3384, The World Bank.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Labonne, Julien & Chase, Robert S., 2008. "Do community-driven development projects enhance social capital ? evidence from the Philippines," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4678, The World Bank.
    2. Deepa Narayan & Lant Pritchett & Soumya Kapoor, 2009. "Moving Out of Poverty : Volume 2. Success from the Bottom Up," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 11838, April.
    3. Julien LABONNE & Adama BAH & Jean-Louis ARCAND, 2010. "Conflict, Ideology and Foreign Aid," Working Papers 201021, CERDI.
    4. Travers Barclay Child, 2017. "We Don’t Need No Education: Reconstruction and Conflict across Afghanistan," HiCN Working Papers 244, Households in Conflict Network.
    5. Alexandre Marc & Alys Willman & Ghazia Aslam & Michelle Rebosio & Kanishka Balasuriya, 2013. "Societal Dynamics and Fragility : Engaging Societies in Responding to Fragile Situations," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 12222, April.
    6. Thomas Vervisch & Kristof Titeca & Koen Vlassenroot & Johan Braeckman, 2013. "Social Capital and Post-Conflict Reconstruction in Burundi: The Limits of Community-based Reconstruction," Development and Change, International Institute of Social Studies, vol. 44(1), pages 147-174, January.
    7. Labonne, Julien & Chase, Robert S., 2011. "Do community-driven development projects enhance social capital? Evidence from the Philippines," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(2), pages 348-358, November.
    8. Barron, Patrick & Kaiser, Kai & Pradhan, Menno, 2009. "Understanding Variations in Local Conflict: Evidence and Implications from Indonesia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 698-713, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Post Conflict Reintegration; Development Economics&Aid Effectiveness; Education and Society; Rural Poverty Reduction; Population Policies;

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