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Equitable provision of long-term public goods: the role of negotiation mandates

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  • Lecocq, Franck
  • Hourcade, Jean-Charles

Abstract

In a one-period model, whether or not individual weights in the welfare function are based on initial endowments dictate who provides public goods. But with long-term public goods, banning wealth redistribution still allows for several equilibriums depending on Parties'willingness to acknowledge changes in negotiating powers over time, and on whether or not they care only for their own descendants. Adaptative and universal mandates lead to far more robust equilibrium. In all cases, a simple rule of thumb for allocating expenditures at first period emerges, independent of both the optimal level of public goods and the second-period distribution of expenditures.

Suggested Citation

  • Lecocq, Franck & Hourcade, Jean-Charles, 2003. "Equitable provision of long-term public goods: the role of negotiation mandates," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3180, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:3180
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. World Bank, 2002. "World Development Indicators 2002," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13921.
    2. Ghersi, Frederic & Hourcade, Jean-Charles, 2001. "The Economics of a Lost Deal," Discussion Papers dp-01-48-, Resources For the Future.
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    6. Guesnerie, R., 1995. "The genealogy of modern theoretical public economics: From first best to second best," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 39(3-4), pages 353-381, April.
    7. Joseph Stiglitz, 1998. "Distinguished Lecture on Economics in Government: The Private Uses of Public Interests: Incentives and Institutions," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(2), pages 3-22, Spring.
    8. John, A Andrew & Pecchenino, Rowena A, 1997. " International and Intergenerational Environmental Externalities," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 99(3), pages 371-387, September.
    9. Christian Azar, 1999. "Weight Factors in Cost-Benefit Analysis of Climate Change," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 13(3), pages 249-268, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hourcade, Jean-Charles & Ambrosi, Philippe & Dumas, Patrice, 2009. "Beyond the Stern Review: Lessons from a risky venture at the limits of the cost-benefit analysis," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(10), pages 2479-2484, August.

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