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Climate Policy Versus Development Aid

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  • Richard S. J. Tol

    (Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI))

Abstract

Rich countries have emitted most of the greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, while poor countries will suffer most from climate change. Rich countries have therefore committed to help poor countries adapt. However, this is financed from the general development budget, and hence may do more harm than good. Furthermore, development aid also finances emission reduction. These aspects of climate policy need to be overhauled. Development assistance should consider the impact of climate change, and reduce emissions where it can, but this can be achieved by marginal adjustments to current practice.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard S. J. Tol, 2007. "Climate Policy Versus Development Aid," Papers WP221, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:esr:wpaper:wp221
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    File URL: http://www.esri.ie/pubs/WP221.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Tol, Richard S.J., 2005. "Emission abatement versus development as strategies to reduce vulnerability to climate change: an application of FUND," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 10(05), pages 615-629, October.
    2. Byrne, John & Wang, Young-Doo & Lee, Hoesung & Kim, Jong-dall, 1998. "An equity- and sustainability-based policy response to global climate change," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 335-343, March.
    3. Schelling, Thomas C, 1995. "Intergenerational discounting," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 23(4-5), pages 395-401.
    4. Tol, Richard S.J., 2007. "Europe's long-term climate target: A critical evaluation," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 424-432, January.
    5. Schelling, Thomas C, 1992. "Some Economics of Global Warming," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(1), pages 1-14, March.
    6. Park, Donghyun, 2001. "Recent trends in the global distribution of income," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 497-501, July.
    7. William Easterly, 2002. "The Elusive Quest for Growth: Economists' Adventures and Misadventures in the Tropics," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262550423, January.
    8. Babiker, Mustafa H., 2001. "Subglobal climate-change actions and carbon leakage: the implication of international capital flows," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 121-139, March.
    9. Alan S. Manne & Richard G. Richels, 1999. "The Kyoto Protocol: A Cost-Effective Strategy for Meeting Environmental Objectives?," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Special I), pages 1-23.
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