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Coordination of joint search in distributed innovation processes: Lessons from the effects of initial code release in Open Source Software development

Author

Listed:
  • Francesco Rullani

    () (Dept. of Business and Management, LUISS Guido Carli Author-Name: Markus C. Becker
    Strategic Organization Design Unit, University of Southern Denmark)

  • Francesco Zirpoli

    () (Dept. of Management, Università Ca' Foscari Venice)

Abstract

This paper casts light on the role of initial code release for providing coordination of joint search processes, i.e., search processes that involve several agents who search together. We develop hypotheses about the role of initial code release for providing coordination, and for whether development projects remain active. We test these hypotheses on a dataset of 5703 open source software projects registered on SourceForge during a two-year period. We find that initial code release is indeed associated with improved coordination, and a higher chance that software development projects will actually release further code subsequently. We contribute to theory on coordination in joint search, common in distributed innovation settings.

Suggested Citation

  • Francesco Rullani & Francesco Zirpoli, 2013. "Coordination of joint search in distributed innovation processes: Lessons from the effects of initial code release in Open Source Software development," Working Papers 20, Department of Management, Università Ca' Foscari Venezia.
  • Handle: RePEc:vnm:wpdman:56
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    File URL: http://virgo.unive.it/wpideas/storage/2013wp20.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2013
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    5. Richard Langlois & Giampaolo Garzarelli, 2008. "Of Hackers and Hairdressers: Modularity and the Organizational Economics of Open-source Collaboration," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(2), pages 125-143.
    6. Stefan Haefliger & Georg von Krogh & Sebastian Spaeth, 2008. "Code Reuse in Open Source Software," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 54(1), pages 180-193, January.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    artefact; coordination; open source; distributed innovation; innovation process; search process;

    JEL classification:

    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • M21 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Economics - - - Business Economics

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