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Financial press and stock markets in times of crisis

Author

Listed:
  • Roberto Casarin

    (Department of Economics, University of Venice C� Foscari)

  • Flaminio Squazzoni

    (Department of Social Studies, University of Brescia)

Abstract

This paper investigates the relationship between negative news in financial newspapers and stock markets in times of global crisis, such as the 2008/2009 period. We analysed one year of front page banner headlines of three financial newspapers, such as the Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, and Il Sole24ore and created an index of bad news at a daily base. We examined the influence of bad news both on market volatility and dynamic correlation of American, Britain and Italian stock markets to look at the impact of bad news on global investment strategies. Our results show that press and markets co-influenced each other in generating market volatility. The three newspapers showed significant differences in their stance on the crisis, with Financial Times more pessimistic. Our results also show that Wall Street Journal bad news had higher predictability value for the correlation between US and the foreign markets. This confirms the international influence of Wall Street Journal.

Suggested Citation

  • Roberto Casarin & Flaminio Squazzoni, 2012. "Financial press and stock markets in times of crisis," Working Papers 2012_04, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
  • Handle: RePEc:ven:wpaper:2012_04
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    Cited by:

    1. Tao Chen & Erin P. K. So & Isabel K. M. Yan, 2021. "Are crises sentimental?," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(1), pages 962-985, January.
    2. Matija Piv{s}korec & Nino Antulov-Fantulin & Petra Kralj Novak & Igor Mozetiv{c} & Miha Grv{c}ar & Irena Vodenska & Tomislav v{S}muc, 2014. "News Cohesiveness: an Indicator of Systemic Risk in Financial Markets," Papers 1402.3483, arXiv.org.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    2008/2009 financial crisis; financial press; bad news; market volatility; dynamic correlation; Wall Street Journal; pessimism.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets
    • C58 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Financial Econometrics

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