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The Economic Effects of Slum Clearance and Urban Renewal in the United States

Author

Listed:
  • William J. Collins

    () (Department of Economics, Vanderbilt University)

  • Katharine Shester

    () (Department of Economics, Vanderbilt University)

Abstract

The Housing Act of 1949 established a federally subsidized program that helped cities clear areas of existing buildings for redevelopment, rehabilitate deteriorating structures, complete comprehensive city plans, and enforce building codes. The program ended in 1974, but not before financing over 2,100 urban renewal projects and generating great controversy. We use an instrumental variable strategy to estimate the program�s effects on city-level outcomes. The estimates are generally positive and economically significant and are not driven by differential changes in cities� demographic composition. We caution that the results do not imply that the program was an equitable or optimal approach to dealing with central-city problems.

Suggested Citation

  • William J. Collins & Katharine Shester, 2010. "The Economic Effects of Slum Clearance and Urban Renewal in the United States," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 1013, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:van:wpaper:1013
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    File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/pubs/VUECON/vu10-w13.pdf
    File Function: First version, October 2010
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Timothy J. Bartik, 1991. "Who Benefits from State and Local Economic Development Policies?," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number wbsle, November.
    2. Hilary Williamson Hoynes, 2000. "Local Labor Markets And Welfare Spells: Do Demand Conditions Matter?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 82(3), pages 351-368, August.
    3. Stock, James H & Wright, Jonathan H & Yogo, Motohiro, 2002. "A Survey of Weak Instruments and Weak Identification in Generalized Method of Moments," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 20(4), pages 518-529, October.
    4. Glaeser, Edward L., 2008. "Cities, Agglomeration, and Spatial Equilibrium," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199290444.
    5. Leah Platt Boustan, 2010. "Was Postwar Suburbanization "White Flight"? Evidence from the Black Migration," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 125(1), pages 417-443.
    6. Esteban Rossi-Hansberg & Pierre-Daniel Sarte & Raymond Owens, 2010. "Housing Externalities," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 118(3), pages 485-535, June.
    7. Roback, Jennifer, 1982. "Wages, Rents, and the Quality of Life," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(6), pages 1257-1278, December.
    8. Collins, William J. & Smith, Fred H., 2007. "A neighborhood-level view of riots, property values, and population loss: Cleveland 1950-1980," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 44(3), pages 365-386, July.
    9. Julie Berry Cullen & Steven D. Levitt, 1999. "Crime, Urban Flight, And The Consequences For Cities," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 81(2), pages 159-169, May.
    10. Bound, John & Holzer, Harry J, 2000. "Demand Shifts, Population Adjustments, and Labor Market Outcomes during the 1980s," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 18(1), pages 20-54, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Yu, Peiyong, 2015. "The Effect of Eminent Domain on Private and Mixed Development on Property Values," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 45(2).
    2. Leah Platt Boustan & Robert A. Margo, 2011. "White Suburbanization and African-American Home Ownership, 1940-1980," NBER Working Papers 16702, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    City growth; Redevelopment; Residential Segregation; Eminent Domain;

    JEL classification:

    • N92 - Economic History - - Regional and Urban History - - - U.S.; Canada: 1913-
    • R30 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - General
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • K11 - Law and Economics - - Basic Areas of Law - - - Property Law

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