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Globalisation, Inequality and Health

Author

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  • Simone Borghesi

    ()

  • Alessandro Vercelli

    ()

Abstract

As we suggested in a previous work (Borghesi and Vercelli, Sustainable globalisation, Ecological Economics, vol.44, n.1, 2003), the process of globalisation affects the sustainability of development mainly through three channels: economic growth, inequality and environmental degradation. This conceptual framework may help us to understand also the causal influence of globalisation on health that represents a fundamental dimension of the quality of life enjoyed by the people and of sustainability. For this purpose, the present paper aims to investigate both the direct and the indirect effects of post-war globalisation, with particular attention to the role played by inequality in the globalisation-health relationship. A few policy implications emerging from the analysis are also discussed, suggesting a policy strategy that can at the same time improve health and make the current globalisation process more compatible with sustainable development.

Suggested Citation

  • Simone Borghesi & Alessandro Vercelli, 2003. "Globalisation, Inequality and Health," Department of Economics University of Siena 413, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
  • Handle: RePEc:usi:wpaper:413
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Angus Deaton, 2003. "Health, Inequality, and Economic Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 41(1), pages 113-158, March.
    2. Alok Bhargava & Dean T. Jamison & Lawrence J. Lau & Christopher J. L. Murray, 2006. "Modeling the effects of health on economic growth," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: Econometrics, Statistics And Computational Approaches In Food And Health Sciences, chapter 20, pages 269-286 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    3. Todd Sandler & Daniel G Arce M, 2002. "A conceptual framework for understanding global and transnational public goods for health," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 23(2), pages 195-222, June.
    4. Samuel H. Preston & Michael R. Haines, 1991. "Fatal Years: Child Mortality in Late Nineteenth-Century America," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number pres91-1.
    5. Alok Bhargava & Jiang Yu, 2006. "A Longitudinal Analysis of Infant and Child Mortality Rates in Developing Countries," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: Econometrics, Statistics And Computational Approaches In Food And Health Sciences, chapter 21, pages 289-301 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    6. David E. Bloom & Jeffrey D. Sachs, 1998. "Geography, Demography, and Economic Growth in Africa," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 29(2), pages 207-296.
    7. Peter H. Lindert & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2003. "Does Globalization Make the World More Unequal?," NBER Chapters,in: Globalization in Historical Perspective, pages 227-276 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. repec:aph:ajpbhl:1997:87:9:1491-1498_6 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Robert Beaglehole & Anthony McMichael, 1999. "The Future of Public Health in a Changing Global Context," Development, Palgrave Macmillan;Society for International Deveopment, vol. 42(4), pages 12-16, December.
    10. Jeffrey D. Sachs, 2001. "Tropical Underdevelopment," NBER Working Papers 8119, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Scott Barrett, 2003. "Global Disease Eradication," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 1(2-3), pages 591-600, 04/05.
    12. Samuel Bowles & Herbert Gintis, 2002. "The Inheritance of Inequality," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(3), pages 3-30, Summer.
    13. repec:aph:ajpbhl:1998:88:7:1074-1080_3 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Borghesi, Simone & Vercelli, Alessandro, 2003. "Sustainable globalisation," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 77-89, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Herzer, Dierk & Nunnenkamp, Peter, 2015. "Income inequality and health: Evidence from developed and developing countries," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 9, pages 1-56.
    2. McNamara, Courtney, 2017. "Trade liberalization and social determinants of health: A state of the literature review," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 176(C), pages 1-13.
    3. Ceddia, M.G. & Bardsley, N.O. & Goodwin, R. & Holloway, G.J. & Nocella, G. & Stasi, A., 2013. "A complex system perspective on the emergence and spread of infectious diseases: Integrating economic and ecological aspects," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 124-131.
    4. Herzer, Dierk & Nunnenkamp, Peter, 2011. "Income inequality and health: New evidence from panel data," Kiel Working Papers 1736, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    5. Nicole Grunewald & Inmaculada Martínez-Zarzoso, 2014. "Green Growth in Mexico, Brazil and Chile: Policy strategies and future prospects," Ibero America Institute for Econ. Research (IAI) Discussion Papers 229, Ibero-America Institute for Economic Research.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    globalisation; inequality; health; sustainable development;

    JEL classification:

    • F02 - International Economics - - General - - - International Economic Order and Integration
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

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