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Convergence of Per Capita GDP Across SAARC Countries

In this paper we have examined the issue of convergence of per capita GDP across 7 South Asian countries during 1960-2000 using World Bank data. Empirical results failed to find evidence of s convergence, b convergence and conditional b (bc) convergence in South Asia. The reasons for non-convergence of per capita GDP can be explained by low and falling volume of intra-country trade, weak governance and low level of growth achieved by the individual countries. Further, non-convergence can be attributed to explanations provided by endogenous growth models.

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File URL: http://www.uow.edu.au/content/groups/public/@web/@commerce/@econ/documents/doc/uow012167.pdf
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Paper provided by School of Economics, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia in its series Economics Working Papers with number wp04-07.

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Length: 25 pages
Date of creation: 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:uow:depec1:wp04-07
Contact details of provider: Postal:
School of Economics, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, Wollongong NSW 2522 Australia

Phone: +612 4221-3659
Fax: +612 4221-3725
Web page: http://business.uow.edu.au/econ/index.html

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