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Contract farming in Mozambique: Implications on gender inequalities within and across rural households

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  • Cecilia Navarra

Abstract

This paper analyses the implication of contract farming on gender inequalities in rural Mozambique. Contract farming is often considered one of the major tools of agribusiness development: it broadly includes those arrangements under which producers commit to provide a pre-defined quantity of crop to a buyer firm. This paper exploits a panel dataset (2002-05) collected by the Mozambican Ministry of Agriculture among a nationally representative sample of rural households to explore contracts' implications for gender equality, both across and within households.

Suggested Citation

  • Cecilia Navarra, 2018. "Contract farming in Mozambique: Implications on gender inequalities within and across rural households," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2018-26, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  • Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp-2018-26
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. Cecilia Navarra, 2017. "Contracts between smallholders and private firms in Mozambique and their implications on food security," WIDER Working Paper Series 197, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. Evers, Barbara & Walters, Bernard, 2000. "Extra-Household Factors and Women Farmers' Supply Response in Sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(7), pages 1341-1345, July.
    5. Alan Brauw, 2015. "Gender, control, and crop choice in northern Mozambique," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 46(3), pages 435-448, May.
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    7. Arndt, Channing & Benfica, Rui & Thurlow, James, 2011. "Gender Implications of Biofuels Expansion in Africa: The Case of Mozambique," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(9), pages 1649-1662, September.
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