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Switching off or switching source : energy consumption and household

Author

Listed:
  • Gassmann F.
  • Tsukada R.

    (UNU-MERIT)

Abstract

Access to energy is fundamental to improving quality of life and is a key imper-ative for economic development Energy Poverty Action. This is particularly truein Central Asia where winters are harsh and long. Changes in energy prices affectthe purchasing power of households, hitting the poor in particular. The impact verymuch depends on a households energy basket and the available strategies for switching to alternative energy sources. Using data from the Kyrgyz Integrated Household Survey KIHS 2011, this paper analyzes the prole of household energy consumption and the impact of electricity tariff increases on the probability that households would switch to alternative energy sources. Results suggest that households would respond to an electricity price increase by increasing consumption of fuels households would tend to move away from electricity-only heating source towards the use of stove-only.

Suggested Citation

  • Gassmann F. & Tsukada R., 2013. "Switching off or switching source : energy consumption and household," MERIT Working Papers 2013-047, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  • Handle: RePEc:unm:unumer:2013047
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Sebestyénné Szép, Tekla, 2018. "A hatósági árcsökkentés lakossági energiafelhasználásra gyakorolt hatásának vizsgálata indexdekompozícióval [Analysing the effects of utility-cost reduction on household energy consumption, using i," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(2), pages 185-205.
    2. Kapsalyamova, Zhanna & Mishra, Ranjeeta & Kerimray, Aiymgul & Karymshakov, Kamalbek & Azhgaliyeva, Dina, 2021. "Why Is Energy Access Not Enough for Choosing Clean Cooking Fuels? Sustainable Development Goals and Beyond," ADBI Working Papers 1234, Asian Development Bank Institute.
    3. Weiner, Csaba & Szép, Tekla, 2021. "Még egyszer a lakossági hatósági energiaárakról. Egy hungarikum átfogó hatáselemzése [Once again on regulated residential energy prices. A comprehensive impact assessment of a hungarian measure]," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(12), pages 1276-1314.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Taxation and Subsidies; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies; Welfare and Poverty; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs; Socialist Systems and Transitional Economies;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • P22 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Prices

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