IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

The impact of electricity market reform on consumers


  • Price, Catherine Waddams
  • Pham, Khac


We examine the effect of electricity market reform on residential consumers, using hypothetical scenarios likely to be prompted by reform. These include raising tariffs to cost reflective levels and introducing a standing charge to recover 10% of the revenue to mirror cost reflective structures. For Albania and Bulgaria, where household expenditure surveys and electricity tariffs are available, we analyse the effects by expenditure decile and region. The impact of reforms varies considerably, depending on how far current tariffs reflect the long run marginal costs of supply, but likely reform scenarios will adversely affect low income households more than others.

Suggested Citation

  • Price, Catherine Waddams & Pham, Khac, 2009. "The impact of electricity market reform on consumers," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 43-48, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:juipol:v:17:y:2009:i:1:p:43-48

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Silva, Patricia & Klytchnikova, Irina & Radevic, Dragana, 2007. "Poverty and environmental impacts of electricity price reforms in Montenegro," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4127, The World Bank.
    2. Baker, Paul & Blundell, Richard & Micklewright, John, 1989. "Modelling Household Energy Expenditures Using Micro-data," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 99(397), pages 720-738, September.
    3. Catherine Waddams & Ruth Hancock, 1998. "Distributional effects of liberalising UK residential utility markets," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 19(3), pages 295-319, August.
    4. Cecilia Ugaz (ed.), 2003. "Utility Privatization and Regulation," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 2942.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Gassmann F. & Tsukada R., 2013. "Switching off or switching source : energy consumption and household," MERIT Working Papers 047, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    2. Franki, Vladimir & Višković, Alfredo, 2015. "Energy security, policy and technology in South East Europe: Presenting and applying an energy security index to Croatia," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 90(P1), pages 494-507.
    3. Deitz, Laura & Stirton, Lindsay & Wright, Kathryn, 2009. "South East Europe's electricity sector: Attractions, obstacles and challenges of Europeanisation," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 4-12, March.
    4. Çetinkaya, Murat & Başaran, Alparslan A. & Bağdadioğlu, Necmiddin, 2015. "Electricity reform, tariff and household elasticity in Turkey," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 79-85.
    5. Srivastava, Govind & Kathuria, Vinish, 2014. "Utility reforms in developing countries: Learning from the experiences of Delhi," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 1-16.
    6. Višković, Alfredo & Franki, Vladimir & Valentić, Vladimir, 2014. "Effect of regulation on power-plant operation and investment in the South East Europe Market: An analysis of two cases," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 8-17.
    7. Moreno, Blanca & López, Ana J. & García-Álvarez, María Teresa, 2012. "The electricity prices in the European Union. The role of renewable energies and regulatory electric market reforms," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 307-313.
    8. Codruţa Mare & Simona Laura Dragoş & Dan Tudor Lazăr & Cristian Mihai Dragoş, 2013. "Consumer protection through prices: an analysis of the energetic sector in European Union countries," The AMFITEATRU ECONOMIC journal, Academy of Economic Studies - Bucharest, Romania, vol. 15(34), pages 327-341, June.
    9. Massimo Florio, 2014. "Energy Reforms and Consumer Prices in the EU over twenty Years," Economics of Energy & Environmental Policy, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1).
    10. Peter A. Groothuis & Tanga McDaniel Mohr, 2014. "Do Consumers Want Smart Meters? Incentives or Inertia: Evidence from North Carolina and Lessons for Policy," Economics of Energy & Environmental Policy, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1).


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:juipol:v:17:y:2009:i:1:p:43-48. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.