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Knowledge Spillovers and Wage Inequality: An Empirical Investigation of Knowledge-Skill Complementarity

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  • Bruinshoofd, Allard
  • Hollanders, Hugo
  • Weel, Bas ter

    (MERIT)

Abstract

This paper examines the importance of knowledge-skill complementarity in the process of contemporary economic growth. By analyzing Dutch manufacturing and carrying out an extensive spillover and wage inequality analysis, it is shown that knowledge-intensive sectors pay their high-skilled workers a relatively higher wage in the form of a wage premium, which is defined as the sector bias of technical change.

Suggested Citation

  • Bruinshoofd, Allard & Hollanders, Hugo & Weel, Bas ter, 1999. "Knowledge Spillovers and Wage Inequality: An Empirical Investigation of Knowledge-Skill Complementarity," Research Memorandum 008, Maastricht University, Maastricht Economic Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  • Handle: RePEc:unm:umamer:1999008
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    File URL: https://www.merit.unu.edu/publications/rmpdf/1999/rm1999-008.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Weel, Bas ter, 1999. "Investing in Knowledge: On the Trade-Off between R&D, ICT, Skills and Migration," Research Memorandum 024, Maastricht University, Maastricht Economic Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    2. Hollanders, Hugo & Weel, Bas ter, 1999. "Skill-Biased Technical Change: On Endogenous Growth, Wage Inequality and Government Intervention," Research Memorandum 013, Maastricht University, Maastricht Economic Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).

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