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Industrial Policy and Growth

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  • Helen Shapiro

Abstract

The paper highlights how the rationales and instruments of industrial policy have changed since the 1960s. It finds that theories of industrialization have come full circle, as many of the assumptions behind the market failure paradigm have made a comeback. The policy implications of these theories, however, have not been similarly resurrected. It makes an explicit comparison between the strategies of East Asia and Latin America, and reviews the explanations for their divergent performance. It identifies a “back to the future” quality of Latin America’s situation, pointing to the region’s balance of payments constraint and dependence on commodity-like industrial products.

Suggested Citation

  • Helen Shapiro, 2007. "Industrial Policy and Growth," Working Papers 53, United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs.
  • Handle: RePEc:une:wpaper:53
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    File URL: http://www.un.org/esa/desa/papers/2007/wp53_2007.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Waldemiro Francisco Sorte Jr., 2016. "State intervention for industrial growth: a comparison between Brazil and Japan," International Journal of Public Policy, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 12(1/2), pages 1-27.
    2. Kross, Karmo, 2013. "Developmental welfare capitalism in East Asia with a special emphasis on South Korea," Discourses in Social Market Economy 2013-05, OrdnungsPolitisches Portal (OPO).
    3. Freire Junior, Clovis, 2017. "Promoting structural transformation: Strategic diversification vs laissez-faire approach," MERIT Working Papers 037, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Industrial Policy; Competitiveness; East Asia; Latin America;

    JEL classification:

    • L52 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy - - - Industrial Policy; Sectoral Planning Methods
    • L53 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy - - - Enterprise Policy
    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology
    • O38 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Government Policy
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East
    • O54 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Latin America; Caribbean
    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations

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