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The Stability of Money Demand in South Africa, 1965-1997

  • Kevin S. Nell

    ()

After the adoption of more market-oriented monetary policy measures in 1980, the South African Reserve Bank primarily relied on setting predetermined growth targets for M3 to achieve its primary objective of price stability. The main purpose of this paper is to test empirically whether there exists a stable long-run demand for money function over the period 1965-1997. The empirical results suggest that there exists a stable long-run demand for money function for M3 in South Africa, while the demand for M1 and M2 display parameter instability following financial reforms since 1980. The results largely support the South African Reserve Bank's view that the M3 money stock could serve as an indicator for monetary policy.

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File URL: ftp://ftp.ukc.ac.uk/pub/ejr/RePEc/ukc/ukcedp/9905.pdf
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Paper provided by School of Economics, University of Kent in its series Studies in Economics with number 9905.

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Date of creation: Feb 1999
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Handle: RePEc:ukc:ukcedp:9905
Contact details of provider: Postal: School of Economics, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NP
Phone: +44 (0)1227 827497
Web page: http://www.kent.ac.uk/economics/

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  1. Milton Friedman, 1959. "The Demand for Money: Some Theoretical and Empirical Results," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 67, pages 327.
  2. Mankiw, N Gregory & Summers, Lawrence H, 1986. "Money Demand and the Effects of Fiscal Policies," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 18(4), pages 415-29, November.
  3. Montiel, P.J., 1995. "Financial Policies and Economic Growth: Theory, Evidence and Country-Specific Experience from Sub-Saharan Africa," Papers 18s, African Economic Research Consortium.
  4. Friedman, Milton, 1971. "A Monetary Theory of Nominal Income," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 79(2), pages 323-37, March-Apr.
  5. Abdur Chowdhury, 1997. "The financial structure and the demand for money in Thailand," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(3), pages 401-409.
  6. Alan Carruth & Jose Roberto Sanchez-Fung, 2000. "Money demand in the Dominican Republic," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(11), pages 1439-1449.
  7. McKinnon, Ronald & Tan, Kong-Yam, 1983. "Currency Substitution and Instability in the World Dollar Standard: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 73(3), pages 474-76, June.
  8. Pierre Perron & Robert J. Shiller, 1984. "Testing the Random Walk Hypothesis: Power Versus Frequency of Observation," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 732, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  9. Choudhry, Taufiq, 1995. "High inflation rates and the long-run money demand function: Evidence from cointegration tests," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 77-91.
  10. Miller, Stephen M, 1991. "Monetary Dynamics: An Application of Cointegration and Error-Correction Modeling," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 23(2), pages 139-54, May.
  11. Johansen, Soren & Juselius, Katarina, 1990. "Maximum Likelihood Estimation and Inference on Cointegration--With Applications to the Demand for Money," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 52(2), pages 169-210, May.
  12. David F. Hendry & Neil R. Ericsson, 1989. "An econometric analysis of UK money demand in MONETARY TRENDS IN THE UNITED STATES AND THE UNITED KINGDOM by Milton Friedman and Anna J. Schwartz," International Finance Discussion Papers 355, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  13. Hoffman, Dennis L. & Rasche, Robert H. & Tieslau, Margie A., 1995. "The stability of long-run money demand in five industrial countries," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 317-339, April.
  14. Taylor, Mark P, 1994. "On the Reinterpretation of Money Demand Regressions," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 26(4), pages 851-66, November.
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