IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/uea/aepppr/2010_19.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Social Capital and Access to Bank Financing: The Case of Chinese Entrepreneurs

Author

Listed:
  • Oleksandr Talavera

    () (School of Economics, University of East Anglia)

  • Lin Xiong

    (Robert Gordon University)

  • Xiong Xiong

    (University of Tianjin)

Abstract

This paper studies the effects of social capital on access to bank financing. Based on a Chinese nationwide survey our analysis suggests that entrepreneurs who spend more time on social activities are more likely to obtain a loan from commercial banks. In addition, we find that membership of political parties is an important determinant of state bank financing. Finally, our data reveal some evidence of substitutability between various types of social capital. To get a loan from a specific type of bank, an entrepreneur should access the relevant social network. The results of our analysis are robust to a number of specification checks.

Suggested Citation

  • Oleksandr Talavera & Lin Xiong & Xiong Xiong, 2010. "Social Capital and Access to Bank Financing: The Case of Chinese Entrepreneurs," University of East Anglia Applied and Financial Economics Working Paper Series 019, School of Economics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK..
  • Handle: RePEc:uea:aepppr:2010_19
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://ueaeco.github.io/working-papers/papers/afe/UEA-AFE-019.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. McGrath, Rita Gunther & MacMillan, Ian C. & Yang, Elena Ai-Yuan & Tsai, William, 1992. "Does culture endure, or is it malleable? Issues for entrepreneurial economic development," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 7(6), pages 441-458, November.
    2. Muravyev, Alexander & Talavera, Oleksandr & Schäfer, Dorothea, 2009. "Entrepreneurs' gender and financial constraints: Evidence from international data," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 270-286, June.
    3. Zhao, Liming & Aram, John D., 1995. "Networking and growth of young technology-intensive ventures in China," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 10(5), pages 349-370, September.
    4. Tsang, Eric W. K., 1994. "Threats and opportunities faced by private businesses in China," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 9(6), pages 451-468, November.
    5. Honig, Benson, 1998. "What determines success? examining the human, financial, and social capital of jamaican microentrepreneurs," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 13(5), pages 371-394, September.
    6. Boot, Arnoud W. A., 2000. "Relationship Banking: What Do We Know?," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 7-25, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Mustafa Caglayan & Oleksandr Talavera & Lin Xiong & Jing Zhang, 2019. "What does not kill us makes us stronger: the story of repetitive consumer loan applications," Discussion Papers 19-01, Department of Economics, University of Birmingham.
    2. Dr. Yen, Shang-Yung & Fan, Song-Chin, 2014. "An Exploration on the Business Model of Social Enterprises Owned By Chinese Entrepreneurs in Taiwan," Asian Economic and Financial Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 4(10), pages 1275-1289, October.
    3. Pham, Tho & Talavera, Oleksandr, 2018. "Discrimination, Social Capital, and Financial Constraints: The Case of Viet Nam," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 228-242.
    4. Hong Sun & Valentina Hartarska & Lezhu Zhang & Denis Nadolnyak, 2018. "The Influence of Social Capital on Farm Household’s Borrowing Behavior in Rural China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(12), pages 1-20, November.
    5. Pham, Tho & Talavera, Oleksandr, 2018. "Discrimination, Social Capital, and Financial Constraints: The Case of Viet Nam," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 228-242.
    6. Reindolf Yao Nani Adzido & Emmanuel Kwame Ahiave & Victor Yao Kamasah & Vivian Akoto & Onesimus Kwashie Dorkpah, 2016. "Assessing Financial Openness and Access to Credit Facilities: The Case of Banks in Ho, Ghana," International Journal of Academic Research in Accounting, Finance and Management Sciences, Human Resource Management Academic Research Society, International Journal of Academic Research in Accounting, Finance and Management Sciences, vol. 6(3), pages 47-57, July.
    7. Phuoc Vu Ha & Michael Frömmel, 2019. "Social Capital, Credit Choices And Growth In Vietnamese Household Businesses," Journal of Developmental Entrepreneurship (JDE), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 24(03), pages 1-19, September.
    8. Liang Zhang & Tie-nan Wang & Hung-Gay Fung, 2014. "Market Reaction to Corporate Social Responsibility Announcements: Evidence from China," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 22(2), pages 81-101, March.
    9. Oleksandr Talavera & Charlie Weir & Lin Xiong, 2017. "Time Allocation and Performance: The Case of Chinese Entrepreneurs," International Journal of the Economics of Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(1), pages 27-51, January.
    10. Christina Nicolas & Amine Tarazi, 2019. "Disentangling the effect of Trust on Bank Lending," Working Papers hal-02384495, HAL.
    11. Kung'U, Gabriel Kamau, 2011. "Factors influencing SMEs access to finance: A case study of Westland Division,Kenya," MPRA Paper 66633, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2014.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Bellucci, Andrea & Borisov, Alexander & Zazzaro, Alberto, 2010. "Does gender matter in bank-firm relationships? Evidence from small business lending," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(12), pages 2968-2984, December.
    2. Peng, Mike W. & Lu, Yuan & Shenkar, Oded & Wang, Denis Y. L., 2001. "Treasures in the China house: a review of management and organizational research on Greater China," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 52(2), pages 95-110, May.
    3. Chung-Ming Lau & Lowell W. Busenitz, 2001. "Growth Intentions of Entrepreneurs in a Transitional Economy: The People's Republic of China," Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, , vol. 26(1), pages 5-20, October.
    4. Jing Yang & Jiatao Li, 2008. "The development of entrepreneurship in China," Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Springer, vol. 25(2), pages 335-359, June.
    5. Annie bellier & Wafa Sayeh & Stéphanie Serve, 2012. "What lies behind credit rationing? A survey of the literature," THEMA Working Papers 2012-39, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
    6. Zhao, Liming & Aram, John D., 1995. "Networking and growth of young technology-intensive ventures in China," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 10(5), pages 349-370, September.
    7. Kitamura, Tomiyuki & Muto, Ichiro & Takei, Ikuo, 2016. "Loan interest rate pass-through and changes after the financial crisis: Japan’s evidence," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 10-30.
    8. Gropp, R. & Grundl, C. & Guttler, A., 2012. "Does Discretion in Lending Increase Bank Risk? Borrower Self-Selection and Loan Officer Capture Effects," Other publications TiSEM bfec5360-2a2b-47e4-ba3f-d, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    9. Minguzzi, Antonio & Passaro, Renato, 2001. "The network of relationships between the economic environment and the entrepreneurial culture in small firms," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 181-207, March.
    10. Sofie Balcaen & Sophie Manigart & Hubert Ooghe, 2011. "From distress to exit: determinants of the time to exit," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 21(3), pages 407-446, August.
    11. Costello, Anna M. & Down, Andrea K. & Mehta, Mihir N., 2020. "Machine + man: A field experiment on the role of discretion in augmenting AI-based lending models," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(2).
    12. Simon Cornée, 2014. "Soft Information and Default Prediction in Cooperative and Social Banks," Journal of Entrepreneurial and Organizational Diversity, European Research Institute on Cooperative and Social Enterprises, vol. 3(1), pages 89-103, June.
    13. Kirschenmann, K., 2010. "The Dynamics in Requested and Granted Loan Terms when Bank and Borrower Interact Repeatedly," Other publications TiSEM 40d5005c-1626-4511-aa8a-f, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    14. Kislat, Carmen & Menkhoff, Lukas & Neuberger, Doris, 2013. "The use of collateral in formal and informal lending," VfS Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79765, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    15. Mitchener, Kris James & Wheelock, David C., 2013. "Does the structure of banking markets affect economic growth? Evidence from U.S. state banking markets," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 161-178.
    16. Juha-Pekka Niinimäki & Tuomas Takalo, 2007. "Benchmarking and Comparing Entrepreneurs with Incomplete Information," Finnish Economic Papers, Finnish Economic Association, vol. 20(2), pages 91-107, Autumn.
    17. Hallak, Issam, 2002. "Why borrowers pay premiums to larger lenders: Empirical evidence from sovereign syndicated loans," CFS Working Paper Series 2002/02, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
    18. Degryse, Hans & Karas, Alexei & Schoors, Koen, 2019. "Relationship lending during a trust crisis on the interbank market: A friend in need is a friend indeed," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 182(C), pages 1-4.
    19. David Ely & Kenneth Robinson, 2009. "Credit Unions and Small Business Lending," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 35(1), pages 53-80, February.
    20. Fukuda, Shin-ichi & Koibuchi, Satoshi, 2007. "The impacts of "shock therapy" on large and small clients: Experiences from two large bank failures in Japan," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 15(5), pages 434-451, November.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    China; social capital; entrepreneurs;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • L26 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Entrepreneurship

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:uea:aepppr:2010_19. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Thomas Cushan). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/esueauk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.