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Historical Patterns of Gender Inequality in Latin America: New Evidence

Author

Listed:
  • María Magdalena Camou

    (Programa de Historia Económica y Social, Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad de la República)

Abstract

The topic of this paper is to explore Latin America’s backwardness in the incorporation of women to the labour market. The collected data allows advancing in the reconstruction of the main disaggregated gender indicators of performance in education, income and life expectancy for a group of Latin American countries (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Peru, México and Venezuela) along the XX century. The evidence shows that Latin America has already achieved gender equality in the results for Education and Life Expectancy in most countries. Nevertheless, the main gap between the sexes is in the labour market, both in the participation rate and in wages. Our preliminary results show a marked relationship between women’s activity rate and Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita, but this is not enough to explain variations between countries

Suggested Citation

  • María Magdalena Camou, 2015. "Historical Patterns of Gender Inequality in Latin America: New Evidence," Documentos de trabajo 38, Programa de Historia Económica, FCS, Udelar.
  • Handle: RePEc:ude:doctra:38
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Psacharopoulos, George & Tzannatos, Zafiris, 1989. "Female Labor Force Participation: An International Perspective," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 4(2), pages 187-201, July.
    2. Barro, Robert J & Lee, Jong-Wha, 2001. "International Data on Educational Attainment: Updates and Implications," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(3), pages 541-563, July.
    3. Schultz, T Paul, 1990. "Women's Changing Participation in the Labor Force: A World Perspective," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 38(3), pages 457-488, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    gender inequality; labour market; gender education gap; Gender Development Index;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • N36 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - Latin America; Caribbean
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development

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