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Do Multilateral Trade Linkages Explain Bilateral Real Exchange Rate Volatility?

  • Claudio Bravo-Ortega

This paper investigates the impact of multilateral trade linkages on bilateral real exchange rate volatility by examining a particular channel —the extent of the e?ects of di?erences on import intensities (GDP’s share of imports of a given product and origin) between trade part- ners—of long-run real exchange rate volatility. I exploit a large panel of cross-country data over the years 1970–97 and construct a micro-founded index to capture this e?ect. In the estima- tions I address carefully endogeneity issues by testing not just exogeneity but also the presence of weak instruments. As robustness check and under the latter I estimate LIML and Fuller(1) regressions to ensure unbiased coe?cients. Results strongly support the hypothesis that a pair of countries with a larger di?erence in the import intensities from the rest of the world faces a larger bilateral real exchange rate volatility. This result turns to be robust to the inclusion of bilateral trade a commonly argued moderator of volatility and other controls. These empirical ?ndings are consistent with recent international trade models that highlight multi-country trade linkages.

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Paper provided by University of Chile, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number wp304.

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Date of creation: Nov 2009
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Handle: RePEc:udc:wpaper:wp304
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.econ.uchile.cl/

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  1. Berthelon, Matias & Freund, Caroline, 2008. "On the conservation of distance in international trade," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(2), pages 310-320, July.
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  8. M. Ayhan Kose & Kei-Mu Yi, 2005. "Can the standard international business cycle model explain the relation between trade and comovement?," Working Papers 05-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
  9. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2004. "The Modern History of Exchange Rate Arrangements: A Reinterpretation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 119(1), pages 1-48.
  10. Joseph P. Byrne & Julia Darby & Ronald MacDonald, 2006. "US Trade and Exchange Rate Volatility: A Real Sectoral Bilateral Analysis," Working Papers 2006_9, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow.
  11. Claudio Bravo-Ortega & Julian di Giovanni, 2006. "Remoteness and Real Exchange Rate Volatility," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 53(si), pages 6.
  12. Hausmann, Ricardo & Panizza, Ugo & Rigobon, Roberto, 2006. "The long-run volatility puzzle of the real exchange rate," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 93-124, February.
  13. Bouoiyour, Jamal & REY, Serge, 2005. "Exchange Rate Regime, Real Exchange Rate, Trade Flows and Foreign Direct Investments: The case of Morocco," MPRA Paper 38643, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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