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The Two Faces of Education in Ethnic Conflict: Towards a peacebuilding education for children


  • Diana Saltarelli
  • Kenneth D. Bush


The Two Faces of Education in Ethnic Conflict challenges a widely-held assumption - that education is inevitably a force for good. While stressing the many stabilizing aspects of good quality education, editors Kenneth Bush and Diana Saltarelli show how education can be manipulated to drive a wedge between people, rather than drawing them closer together. After analyzing the increasing importance of ethnicity in contemporary conflicts, this Innocenti Insight outlines the negative and positive faces of education in situations of tension or violence, including the denial of education as a weapon of war (negative) and the cultivation of inclusive citizenship (positive). It emphasizes the need for peacebuilding education that goes further than the 'add good education and stir' approach, aiming to transform the very foundations of intolerance.

Suggested Citation

  • Diana Saltarelli & Kenneth D. Bush, 2000. "The Two Faces of Education in Ethnic Conflict: Towards a peacebuilding education for children," Papers innins00/7, Innocenti Insights.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucf:innins:innins00/7

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Thomas Hammarberg, 1998. "A School for Children with Rights: The significance of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child for modern education policy," Papers innlec98/1, Innocenti Lectures.
    2. Robert H. Haveman & Barbara L. Wolfe, 1984. "Schooling and Economic Well-Being: The Role of Nonmarket Effects," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 19(3), pages 377-407.
    3. Gintis, Herbert, 1971. "Education, Technology, and the Characteristics of Worker Productivity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 61(2), pages 266-279, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lauritzen, Solvor MjĂžberg, 2016. "Building peace through education in a post-conflict environment: A case study exploring perceptions of best practices," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 77-83.
    2. Ngambouk Vitalis Pemunta & Eno-Akpa Rene Nkongho, 2014. "The Fragility of the Liberal Peace Export to South Sudan: Formal Education Access as a Basis of a Liberal Peace Project," Journal of Human Security, Librello publishing house, vol. 10(1), pages 59-75.
    3. Alva, Soumya & Murrugarra, Edmundo & Paci, Pierella, 2002. "The hidden costs of ethnic conflict - decomposing trends in educational outcomes of young Kosovars," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2880, The World Bank.
    4. Justino, Patricia, 2016. "Supply and demand restrictions to education in conflict-affected countries: New research and future agendas," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 76-85.
    5. Matsumoto, Mitsuko, 2016. "Three strands of explanations on root causes of civil war in low-income and weak states in sub-Saharan Africa: Implications for education," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 1-10.
    6. Singha, Komal, 2013. "Conflict and education in Manipur: A comparative analysis," Working Papers 305, Institute for Social and Economic Change, Bangalore.


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