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Children's Perspectives on Economic Adversity: A review of the literature

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  • Gerry Redmond

Abstract

This paper reviews some of the recent qualitative literature on children's perspectives on economic disadvantage. The idea of asking people who experience disadvantage about their own situations is still a relatively new one in the social sciences, and the idea of asking children about their own perceptions of economic and social disadvantage is even more recent. Nine analyses, all published since 1998, and all of them involving in-depth interviews or group work with children aged between 5 and 17, are examined in detail. Most of these studies develop frameworks based on the 'new sociology of childhood', which emphasises the social construction of childhood and children's agency in the context of child-adult relations. The nine studies cover a number of issues related to economic disadvantage, including exclusion from activities and peer groups at school and in the community; perceptions of 'poor' and 'affluent' children; participation in organized activities outside of school hours; methods of coping with financial hardship; support for parents in coping and in seeking and keeping employment, and aspirations for future careers and lives.

Suggested Citation

  • Gerry Redmond, 2008. "Children's Perspectives on Economic Adversity: A review of the literature," Papers indipa08/2, Innocenti Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucf:indipa:indipa08/2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gary S. Becker, 1981. "A Treatise on the Family," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number beck81-1.
    2. Iversen, Vegard, 2002. "Autonomy in Child Labor Migrants," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 817-834, May.
    3. Caterina Ruggeri Laderchi & Ruhi Saith & Frances Stewart, 2003. "Does it Matter that we do not Agree on the Definition of Poverty? A Comparison of Four Approaches," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(3), pages 243-274.
    4. Wang, Sijun & Holloway, Betsy B. & Beatty, Sharon E. & Hill, William W., 2007. "Adolescent influence in family purchase decisions: An update and cross-national extension," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 60(11), pages 1117-1124, November.
    5. Mario Biggeri & Renato Libanora & Stefano Mariani & Leonardo Menchini, 2006. "Children Conceptualizing their Capabilities: Results of a Survey Conducted during the First Children's World Congress on Child Labour," Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(1), pages 59-83.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Candace Currie & Dorothy Currie & Leonardo Menchini & Chris Roberts & Dominic Richardson, 2011. "Comparing Inequality in the Well-being of Children in Economically Advanced Countries: A methodology," Papers inwopa651, Innocenti Working Papers.
    2. Liliana Fernandes & Américo Mendes & Aurora Teixeira, 2013. "A Weighted Multidimensional Index of Child Well-Being Which Incorporates Children’s Individual Perceptions," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 114(3), pages 803-829, December.
    3. Skattebol, Jen, 2011. ""When the money's low": Economic participation among disadvantaged young Australians," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 528-533, April.
    4. Liliana Fernandes & Américo Mendes & Aurora Teixeira, 2010. "A review essay on child well-being measurement: uncovering the paths for future research," Working Papers de Economia (Economics Working Papers) 02, Católica Porto Business School, Universidade Católica Portuguesa.
    5. Lucinda Platt, 2016. "Conducting qualitative and quantitative research with children of different ages," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 71258, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    6. Liliana Fernandes & Américo Mendes & Aurora Teixeira, 2012. "A Review Essay on the Measurement of Child Well-Being," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 106(2), pages 239-257, April.
    7. Laura Camfield, 2010. "“Even If She Learns, She Doesn’t Understand Properly”. Children’s Understandings of Illbeing and Poverty in Five Ethiopian Communities," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 96(1), pages 85-112, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    children's opinion; disadvantaged children; economic discrimination; literature surveys;

    JEL classification:

    • I39 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Other

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