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Inclusive Crises, Exclusive Recoveries, and Policies to Prevent a Double Whammy for the Poor

  • Ronald Mendoza
  • Ronald

    (Division of Policy and Practice,UNICEF)

When it comes to aggregate economic shocks, the poor and the near-poor often face a double whammy. They are often among the most adversely affected by the shock, suffering from crisis effects that push them and their children deeper into poverty. The poor and near-poor are also the least equipped to participate in and benefit from the subsequent recovery. In a grim twist of irony, the very same coping strategies that the poor turn to, in order to survive and weather the crisis are often also among the causes for their inability to recover quickly. This paper reviews the emerging evidence on the impact of the global economic crisis and food and fuel price volatility of 2008-2009, and it analyzes some of the key policy responses deployed by governments. It finds evidence suggesting that once again the poor risk facing a double whammy. To help ensure a more inclusive social and economic recovery, governments could follow a pro-poor countercyclical strategy that preserves social spending and investments as well as uses part of these resources to develop social protection systems. Failure to do so risks translating the effects of the crisis into permanent harm for children, women and poor families.

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File URL: http://www.unicef.org/socialpolicy/files/Inclusive_Crises_Exclusive_Recoveries.pdf
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Paper provided by UNICEF,Division of Policy and Strategy in its series Working papers with number 1004.

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Length: 44 pages
Date of creation: 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:uce:wpaper:1004
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  1. Andrea de Michelis, 2009. "Overcoming the Financial Crisis in the United States," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 669, OECD Publishing.
  2. Kasekende Louis & Brixova Zuzana & Ndikumana Leonce, 2010. "Africa: Africa's Counter-Cyclical Policy Responses to the Crisis," Journal of Globalization and Development, De Gruyter, vol. 1(1), pages 1-22, January.
  3. Ronald Mendoza & Megan Torres, 2010. "Aftershocks from the Global Food Crisis," Working briefs 1001, UNICEF, Division of Policy and Strategy.
  4. Furceri, Davide, 2010. "Stabilization effects of social spending: Empirical evidence from a panel of OECD countries," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 34-48, March.
  5. Pedro Conceicao & Namsuk Kim & Ronald Mendoza & Yanchun Zhang, 2009. "Human Development in Crisis," Working papers 0903, UNICEF,Division of Policy and Strategy.
  6. Nopo, Hugo & Atal, Juan Pablo & Winder, Natalia, 2010. "New Century, Old Disparities: Gender and Ethnic Wage Gaps in Latin America," IZA Discussion Papers 5085, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Ronald Mendoza, 2009. "Aggregate Shocks, Poor Household and Children: Transmission Channels and Policy Responses," Working papers 0901, UNICEF,Division of Policy and Strategy.
  8. Tiwari, Sailesh & Zaman, Hassan, 2010. "The impact of economic shocks on global undernourishment," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5215, The World Bank.
  9. del Ninno, Carlo & Dorosh, Paul A. & Smith, Lisa C., 2003. "Public policy, food markets, and household coping strategies in Bangladesh," FCND discussion papers 156, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  10. Ethan Ilzetzki & Carlos A. Vegh, 2008. "Procyclical Fiscal Policy in Developing Countries: Truth or Fiction?," NBER Working Papers 14191, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Juan Pablo Atal & Hugo R. Ñopo & Natalia Winder, 2009. "New Century, Old Disparities: Gender and Ethnic Wage Gaps in Latin America," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 5398, Inter-American Development Bank.
  12. Ffrench-Davis Ricardo, 2010. "Latin America: The Structural Fiscal Balance Policy in Chile: A Move Toward Counter-Cyclical Macroeconomics," Journal of Globalization and Development, De Gruyter, vol. 1(1), pages 1-16, January.
  13. Ronald Mendoza & Nicholas Rees, 2009. "Infant Mortality During Economic Downturns and Recovery," Working papers 0904, UNICEF,Division of Policy and Strategy.
  14. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521898010 is not listed on IDEAS
  15. Friedman, Jed & Schady, Norbert, 2009. "How many more infants are likely to die in Africa as a result of the global financial crisis ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5023, The World Bank.
  16. Markus Bruckner & Rabah Arezki, 2010. "International Commodity Price Shocks, Democracy, and External Debt," IMF Working Papers 10/53, International Monetary Fund.
  17. Davide Furceri, 2009. "Stabilization Effects of Social Spending: Empirical Evidence from a Panel of OECD Countries Overcoming the Financial Crisis in the United States," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 675, OECD Publishing.
  18. Simon Davies & James Davey, 2008. "A Regional Multiplier Approach to Estimating the Impact of Cash Transfers on the Market: The Case of Cash Transfers in Rural Malawi," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 26(1), pages 91-111, 01.
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  20. Ferreira, Francisco H. G. & Schady, Norbert, 2008. "Aggregate economic shocks, child schooling and child health," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4701, The World Bank.
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