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Micro-Level Determinants of Lecture Attendance and Additional Study-Hours


  • Martin Ryan

    (UCD Geary Institute, University College Dublin)

  • Liam Delaney

    (UCD Geary Institute, University College Dublin; School of Economics, University College Dublin; School of Public Health and Population Science, University College Dublin)

  • Colm Harmon

    (UCD Geary Institute, University College Dublin; School of Economics, University College Dublin; IZA, Bonn)


This paper uses novel measures of individual differences that produce new insights about student inputs into the (higher) education production function. The inputs examined are lecture attendance and additional study-hours. The data were collected through a websurvey that the authors designed. The analysis includes novel measures of individual di_erences including willingness to take risks, consideration of future consequences and non-cognitive ability traits. Besides age, gender and year of study, the main determinants of lecture attendance and additional study-hours are attitude to risk, future-orientation and conscientiousness. In addition, future-orientation, and in particular conscientiousness, determine lecture attendance to a greater extent than they determine additional study. Finally, we show that family income and _financial transfers (from both parents and the state) do not determine any educational input. This study suggests that non-cognitive abilities may be more important than financial constraints in the determination of inputs related to educational production functions.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Ryan & Liam Delaney & Colm Harmon, 2010. "Micro-Level Determinants of Lecture Attendance and Additional Study-Hours," Working Papers 201036, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucd:wpaper:201036

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Pedro Carneiro & James J. Heckman, 2002. "The Evidence on Credit Constraints in Post--secondary Schooling," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(482), pages 705-734, October.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Lecture Attendance at Irish Universities
      by Martin Ryan in Geary Behaviour Centre on 2010-09-01 18:04:00

    More about this item


    Socio-Economic Status; Education; Inequality; Discrimination;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • D90 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - General

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