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New Directions in Immigration Policy: Canada’s Evolving Approach to Immigration Selection

  • Ferrer, Ana M.
  • Picot, Garnett
  • Riddell, W. Craig

Canada’s immigration system is currently undergoing significant change driven by several goals that include: (1) a desire to improve the economic outcomes of entering immigrants, given the deterioration in labour market outcomes over the past several decades; (2) an attempt to better respond to short-term regional labour market shortages often associated with commodity booms, and (3) a desire to shift immigration away from the three largest cities to other regions of the country. These goals are reflected in the modification of the point system in 2002 and the implementation of a series of new immigrant programs. The paper discusses the recent changes to Canadian immigration policy and examines the preliminary results achieved by the new programs.

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Paper provided by Vancouver School of Economics in its series CLSSRN working papers with number clsrn_admin-2012-34.

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Length: 38 pages
Date of creation: 30 Nov 2012
Date of revision: 30 Nov 2012
Handle: RePEc:ubc:clssrn:clsrn_admin-2012-34
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References listed on IDEAS
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  1. Charles Beach & Alan G. Green & Christopher Worswick, 2006. "Impacts of the Point System and Immigration Policy Levers on Skill Characteristics of Canadian Immigrants," Working Papers 1115, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  2. Joseph Schaafsma & Arthur Sweetman, 2001. "Immigrant earnings: age at immigration matters," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 34(4), pages 1066-1099, November.
  3. Manish Pandey & James Townsend, 2011. "Quantifying the Effects of the Provincial Nominee Programs," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 37(4), pages 495-512, December.
  4. Baker, Michael & Benjamin, Dwayne, 1994. "The Performance of Immigrants in the Canadian Labor Market," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 12(3), pages 369-405, July.
  5. Ana Ferrer & W. Craig Riddell, 2008. "Education, credentials, and immigrant earnings," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 41(1), pages 186-216, February.
  6. Bloom, D. & Grenier, G. & Gunderson, M., 1993. "The Changing Labour Market Position of Canadian Immigrants," Working Papers 9305e, University of Ottawa, Department of Economics.
  7. Manish Pandey & James Townsend, 2010. "Provincial Nominee Programs: An Evaluation of the Earnings and Retention Rates of Nominees," Departmental Working Papers 2010-01, The University of Winnipeg, Department of Economics.
  8. Charles M. Beach & Christopher Worswick, 2011. "Toward Improving Canada's Skilled Immigration Policy: An Evaluation Approach," C.D. Howe Institute Policy Studies, C.D. Howe Institute, number 20111, June.
  9. Ana Ferrer & David A. Green & W. Craig Riddell, 2006. "The Effect of Literacy on Immigrant Earnings," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 41(2).
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