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Stock Price Targeting and Fiscal Deficit in Japan: Why Did the Fiscal Deficit Increase . during Japan's Lost Decades?

Author

Listed:
  • Shin-ichi Fukuda

    (Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo)

  • Junji Yamada

    (Graduate School of Economics, University of Tokyo)

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to explain why Japan's fiscal deficit increased so dramatically in the 1990s and the 2000s. We focus on the role of "stock price targeting" to explain why the fiscal expenditure increased so much. After presenting a simple model to describe government behavior with an optimistic view about stock price and output growth, the paper tests whether the model can explain Japan's fiscal expenditure. The empirical results, using biannual and highfrequency data of the 1990s and the 2000s, show that the stock price targeting can track Japan's fiscal expenditure reasonably well, especially in the 1990s. They imply that without the stock price targeting, the total amount of biannual fiscal stimulus from 1992 to 2000 would have been lower by 2.5 trillion yen on average.

Suggested Citation

  • Shin-ichi Fukuda & Junji Yamada, 2011. "Stock Price Targeting and Fiscal Deficit in Japan: Why Did the Fiscal Deficit Increase . during Japan's Lost Decades?," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-819, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
  • Handle: RePEc:tky:fseres:2011cf819
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    File URL: http://www.cirje.e.u-tokyo.ac.jp/research/dp/2011/2011cf819.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Fukuda, Shinichi & Teruyama, Hiroshi, 1994. "The Sustainability of Budget Deficits in Japan," Hitotsubashi Journal of Economics, Hitotsubashi University, vol. 35(2), pages 109-119, December.
    2. Bayoumi, Tamim, 2001. "The morning after: explaining the slowdown in Japanese growth in the 1990s," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(2), pages 241-259, April.
    3. Valerie A. Ramey, 2011. "Identifying Government Spending Shocks: It's all in the Timing," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 126(1), pages 1-50.
    4. Davig, Troy & Leeper, Eric M., 2011. "Monetary-fiscal policy interactions and fiscal stimulus," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 211-227, February.
    5. Shin‐ichi Fukuda & Jun‐ichi Nakamura, 2011. "Why Did ‘Zombie’ Firms Recover in Japan?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34, pages 1124-1137, July.
    6. Christina D. Romer & David H. Romer, 2010. "The Macroeconomic Effects of Tax Changes: Estimates Based on a New Measure of Fiscal Shocks," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(3), pages 763-801, June.
    7. Ihori, Toshihiro & Doi, Takero & Kondo, Hiroki, 2001. "Japanese fiscal reform: fiscal reconstruction and fiscal policy," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 351-370, December.
    8. Albert Jaeger & Ludger Schuknecht, 2007. "Boom-Bust Phases in Asset Prices and Fiscal Policy Behavior," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(6), pages 45-66, November.
    9. Robert J. Barro & Charles J. Redlick, 2011. "Macroeconomic Effects From Government Purchases and Taxes," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 126(1), pages 51-102.
    10. Olivier Blanchard & Roberto Perotti, 2002. "An Empirical Characterization of the Dynamic Effects of Changes in Government Spending and Taxes on Output," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(4), pages 1329-1368.
    11. Miyazaki, Tomomi, 2010. "The effects of fiscal policy in the 1990s in Japan: A VAR analysis with event studies," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 80-87, March.
    12. Martin Feldstein, 2009. "Rethinking the Role of Fiscal Policy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(2), pages 556-559, May.
    13. Doi, Takero & Ihori, Toshihiro, 2002. "Fiscal Reconstruction and Local Interest Groups in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 492-511, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:kob:wpaper:1625 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Takao Fujii & Kazuki Hiraga & Masafumi Kozuka, 2012. "Analyses of Public Investment Shock in Japan: Factor Augmented Vector Autoregressive Approach," Keio/Kyoto Joint Global COE Discussion Paper Series 2012-006, Keio/Kyoto Joint Global COE Program.
    3. Kato, Ryuta Ray & Miyamoto, Hiroaki, 2013. "Fiscal stimulus and labor market dynamics in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 33-58.
    4. Kazuki Hiraga & Masafumi Kozuka & Tomomi Miyazaki, 2016. "Public Capital and Asset Prices: Time-series Evidence from Japan," Discussion Papers 1625, Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University.
    5. Kengo Nutahara, 2013. "Asset Price Targeting Government Spending and Equilibrium Indeterminacy in A Sticky-Price Economy," CIGS Working Paper Series 13-003E, The Canon Institute for Global Studies.
    6. Etsuro Shioji, 2017. "Extracting fiscal policy expectations from a cross section of daily stock returns," UTokyo Price Project Working Paper Series 077, University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Economics.
    7. repec:bla:jecrev:v:68:y:2017:i:3:p:364-393 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H62 - Public Economics - - National Budget, Deficit, and Debt - - - Deficit; Surplus
    • H50 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - General
    • H30 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - General
    • H12 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government - - - Crisis Management

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