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Does Community Management Help Keep Kids in Schools? Evidence Using Panel Data from El Salvador's EDUCO Program

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  • Emmanuel Jimenez

    (The World Bank)

  • Yasuyuki Sawada

    (Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo)

Abstract

This paper investigates how community management of schools can affect educational outcomes, such as retention and repetition rates. In our model, parents make decisions about whether their children should remain in school or not, and they monitor the performance of the teachers. To test the theoretical implications, we use a unique data set from El Salvador, which has recently expanded the role of communities in school management through its EDUCO program. We find that EDUCO has a positive and robust influence on students, encouraging them to continue their schooling. Our results suggest that community participation is largely responsible for the positive effect of the EDUCO program. The better classroom environment and careful teacher management under the EDUCO program also seem to contribute to the positive results. We conclude that in El Salvador, decentralization of responsibilities to communities has had significant positive effects on educational outcomes.

Suggested Citation

  • Emmanuel Jimenez & Yasuyuki Sawada, 2003. "Does Community Management Help Keep Kids in Schools? Evidence Using Panel Data from El Salvador's EDUCO Program," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-236, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
  • Handle: RePEc:tky:fseres:2003cf236
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    File URL: http://www.cirje.e.u-tokyo.ac.jp/research/dp/2003/2003cf236.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    13. Jimenez, Emmanuel & Sawada, Yasuyuki, 1999. "Do Community-Managed Schools Work? An Evaluation of El Salvador's EDUCO Program," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 13(3), pages 415-441, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Azaola, Marta Cristina, 2014. "Community school programmes in Latin America: Imagining the long-term impact of developing pupils’ agency," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 80-86.

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