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Sustainable consumption dilemmas

Author

Listed:
  • Vringer, Kees
  • Heijden, Eline Van Der

    (Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management)

  • Soest, Daan Van

    (Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management)

  • Vollebergh, Herman

    (Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management)

  • Dietz, Frank

Abstract

To examine which considerations play a role when individuals make decisions to purchase sustainable product varieties or not, we have conducted a large scale field experiment with more than 600 participating households. Households can vote on whether the budgets they receive should only be spent on purchasing the sustainable product variety, or whether every household in a group is free to spend their budget on any product variety. By conducting several treatments, we tested whether people tend to view sustainable consumption as a social dilemma or as a moral dilemma. We find little support for the hypothesis that social dilemma considerations are the key drivers of sustainable consumption behaviour. Participants seem to be caught in a moral dilemma in which they not only weigh their individual financial costs with the sustainable benefits but they also consider the consequences of restricting other people’s freedom of choice. Complementary survey results further substantiate this claim and show that many people are reluctant to impose restrictions on their peers, but, at the same time, our results also suggest substantial support for the government to regulate the availability of unsustainable product varieties.

Suggested Citation

  • Vringer, Kees & Heijden, Eline Van Der & Soest, Daan Van & Vollebergh, Herman & Dietz, Frank, 2017. "Sustainable consumption dilemmas," Other publications TiSEM d683e2ed-c465-468e-b537-0, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
  • Handle: RePEc:tiu:tiutis:d683e2ed-c465-468e-b537-01a0a0069d76
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Gerrit Antonides, 2017. "Sustainable Consumer Behaviour: A Collection of Empirical Studies," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(10), pages 1-5, September.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D11 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Theory
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis

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