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Cost-Sharing Design Matters : A Comparison of the Rebate and Deductible in Healthcare

Author

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  • Remmerswaal, Minke

    (Tilburg University, Center For Economic Research)

  • Boone, Jan

    (Tilburg University, Center For Economic Research)

  • Bijlsma, Michiel

    (Tilburg University, Center For Economic Research)

  • Douven, R.C.M.H.

Abstract

Since 2006, the Dutch population has faced two different cost-sharing schemes in health insurance for curative care: a mandatory rebate of 255 euros in 2006 and 2007, and since 2008 a mandatory deductible. Using administrative data for the entire Dutch population, we compare the effect of both cost-sharing schemes on healthcare consumption between 2006 and 2013. We use a regression discontinuity design which exploits the fact that persons younger than eighteen years old neither face a rebate nor a deductible. Our fixed effect estimate shows that for individuals around the age of eighteen, a one euro increase of the deductible reduces healthcare expenditures 18 eurocents more than a euro increase of the rebate. These results demonstrate that differences in the design of a cost-sharing scheme can lead to substantial different effects on total healthcare expenditure.
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Suggested Citation

  • Remmerswaal, Minke & Boone, Jan & Bijlsma, Michiel & Douven, R.C.M.H., 2017. "Cost-Sharing Design Matters : A Comparison of the Rebate and Deductible in Healthcare," Discussion Paper 2017-049, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:tiu:tiucen:624251d4-89fb-4c0b-8dd1-f0d3d949e591
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    deductible; rebate; cost-sharing; healthcare consumption; regression discontinuity; panel data;

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