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The Weekend School Effect on Perceived Cognitive and Social Competences: Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Experiment


  • Van Klaveren, C.
  • Terwijn, H.
  • Meyer, E.


This study reports the results of a randomized controlled experiment in the Netherlands that was conducted in 2005 to examine if a Weekend School did positively affect perceived competences. For this purpose, 216 Dutch 7thgraders (aged 10/11) were randomly assigned to a Weekend School program and a waiting list. This study focuses on the following competences: scholastic competence, social acceptance, behavioral conduct, global self-worth and outspokenness. These competences are measured before and 10 months after the start of the Weekend School program. Experimental results suggest that the Weekend School program did not affect children's perceived competences.

Suggested Citation

  • Van Klaveren, C. & Terwijn, H. & Meyer, E., 2011. "The Weekend School Effect on Perceived Cognitive and Social Competences: Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Experiment," Working Papers 38, Top Institute for Evidence Based Education Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:tir:wpaper:38

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Lex Borghans & Angela Lee Duckworth & James J. Heckman & Bas ter Weel, 2008. "The Economics and Psychology of Personality Traits," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 43(4).
    2. Brian A. Jacob & Lars Lefgren, 2004. "Remedial Education and Student Achievement: A Regression-Discontinuity Analysis," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(1), pages 226-244, February.
    3. Bellei, Cristián, 2009. "Does lengthening the school day increase students' academic achievement? Results from a natural experiment in Chile," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 629-640, October.
    4. Claessens, Amy & Duncan, Greg & Engel, Mimi, 2009. "Kindergarten skills and fifth-grade achievement: Evidence from the ECLS-K," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 415-427, August.
    5. Yona Rubinstein & James J. Heckman, 2001. "The Importance of Noncognitive Skills: Lessons from the GED Testing Program," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 145-149, May.
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