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OPEC, Shale Oil, and Global Warming - On the importance of the order of extraction

Author

Listed:
  • Hassan Benchekroun

    () (McGill University, CIREQ)

  • Gerard (G.C.) van der Meijden

    () (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam; Tinbergen Institute, The Netherlands)

  • Cees Withagen

    () (IPAG Business School (Paris), Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Tinbergen Institute)

Abstract

We show that OPEC's market power contributes to global warming by enabling producers of relatively expensive and dirty oil to start producing before OPEC reserves are depleted. We fully characterize the equilibrium of a cartel-fringe model and use a calibration to examine the importance of this extraction sequence effect. While welfare under the cartel-fringe equilibrium can be significantly lower than under a first-best outcome, almost all of this welfare loss is due to the sequence effect. Moreover, the recent boom in shale oil reserves may reduce social welfare and renewables subsidies can increase the carbon content of current extraction.

Suggested Citation

  • Hassan Benchekroun & Gerard (G.C.) van der Meijden & Cees Withagen, 2017. "OPEC, Shale Oil, and Global Warming - On the importance of the order of extraction," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 17-104/VIII, Tinbergen Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:tin:wpaper:20170104
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. van der Meijden, Gerard & Ryszka, Karolina & Withagen, Cees, 2018. "Double limit pricing," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 153-167.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Benchekroun, Hassan & van der Meijden, Gerard & Withagen, Cees, 2019. "An oligopoly-fringe non-renewable resource game in the presence of a renewable substitute," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 1-20.
    2. Roberts, Gavin & Barbier, Edward & van 't Veld, Klaas, 2019. "Global emissions from crude oil: The effect of oil-deposit heterogeneity," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 132(C), pages 654-664.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    cartel-fringe; climate policy; non-renewable resource; Herfindahl rule; limit pricing;

    JEL classification:

    • Q31 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q42 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Alternative Energy Sources
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy

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