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Coco Design, Risk Shifting Incentives and Capital Regulation

Author

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  • Stephanie Chan

    (University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands)

  • Sweder van Wijnbergen

    (University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands)

Abstract

Contingent convertible capital (CoCo) is a debt instrument that converts to equity or is written off if the issuing bank fails to meet a distress threshold. The conversion increases the issuer's loss-absorption capacity, but results in wealth transfers between CoCo holders and shareholders, which may change risk-shifting incentives to shareholders. Higher risk increases the probability of CoCo conversion, while lowering the wealth transfer. We show that for Principal-Write-Down (PWD) CoCos, the net effect is to always increase risk-shifting incentives, while for equity-converting CoCos, it depends on the extent of dilution after conversion. We integrate the analysis in a game-theoretic optimal capital regulation framework and show that use of PWD or insuffciently dilutive CE CoCos requires higher capital requirements for given asset structure to offset the rising risk-shifting incentives these instruments give rise to.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephanie Chan & Sweder van Wijnbergen, 2016. "Coco Design, Risk Shifting Incentives and Capital Regulation," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 16-007/VI, Tinbergen Institute, revised 13 Nov 2017.
  • Handle: RePEc:tin:wpaper:20160007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Daniƫl Vullings, 2016. "Contingent convertible bonds with floating coupon payments: fixing the equilibrium problem," DNB Working Papers 517, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    2. Mike Derksen & Peter Spreij & Sweder van Wijnbergen, 2018. "Accounting Noise and the Pricing of CoCos," Papers 1804.06890, arXiv.org.
    3. Goncharenko, Roman & Ongena, Steven & Rauf, Asad, 2018. "The Agency of CoCos: Why Contingent Convertible Bonds Aren't for Everyone," CEPR Discussion Papers 13344, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Martijn A. Boermans & Sweder van Wijnbergen, 2018. "Contingent convertible bonds: Who invests in European CoCos?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(4), pages 234-238, February.
    5. Goncharenko, Roman & Ongena, Steven & Rauf, Asad, 2017. "The agency of CoCo: Why do banks issue contingent convertible bonds?," CFS Working Paper Series 586, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Contingent Convertible Capital; Systemic Risk; Risk Shifting Incentives; Capital Requirements;

    JEL classification:

    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G13 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Contingent Pricing; Futures Pricing
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • G32 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Financing Policy; Financial Risk and Risk Management; Capital and Ownership Structure; Value of Firms; Goodwill

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