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The Effects of Railway Investments in a Polycentric City

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Listed:
  • Ghebreegziabiher Debrezion

    () (Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam)

  • Eric Pels

    () (Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam)

  • Piet Rietveld

    () (Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam)

Abstract

This paper analyses the effect of railway investment on land prices and land use in a polycentric city under various regulatory regimes of land markets. The introduction of a faster mode of transport (train), accessible in discrete locations leads to an extended city size. The stations of the “fast” mode attract dense residential settlements. As a result, the average residential and commercial land rents increase in both the competitive and segmented land market situations, as compared with the “slow” unimodal transport case. When rail investments only serve one particular centre, this leads to the growth of the advantaged centre at the expense of the other centre. Generally speaking, investment in the fast mode results in city growth and increase in rent receipts. However the effect of the investment for individual centres and their corresponding residential areas depends on the underlying land market assumptions and the level of investment. Distorted land markets lead to increases in commercial rents, but this is more than off-set by the decrease in residential land rent. This discussion paper resulted in an article in Environment and Planning A (2007). Volume 39, pages 2048-2067.

Suggested Citation

  • Ghebreegziabiher Debrezion & Eric Pels & Piet Rietveld, 2004. "The Effects of Railway Investments in a Polycentric City," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 04-089/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:tin:wpaper:20040089
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    JEL classification:

    • R14 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Land Use Patterns
    • R40 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - General

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