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Neoliberalism, Neoclassicism, and Economic Welfare

Author

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  • John Harvey

    () (Department of Economics, Texas Christian University)

Abstract

The object of this paper is to examine the theory that justified these policies, describe an alternative approach that argues they were ill-advised, and take a brief look at a small group of Latin American countries in the aftermath of the Mexican Crisis. It will be shown that not only does the alternative view raise serious doubts about the efficacy of Neoliberalism, but that those countries that refused to follow suit were better protected against contagion after the December Mistake.

Suggested Citation

  • John Harvey, 2009. "Neoliberalism, Neoclassicism, and Economic Welfare," Working Papers 200902, Texas Christian University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:tcu:wpaper:200902
    as

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    File URL: http://www.econ.tcu.edu/RePEc/tcu/wpaper/wp09-02.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2009
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Moritz Cruz & Edmund Amann & Bernard Walters, 2006. "Expectations, the business cycle and the Mexican peso crisis," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 30(5), pages 701-722, September.
    2. repec:mes:jeciss:v:32:y:1998:i:2:p:351-363 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Chwieroth, Jeffrey, 2007. "Neoliberal Economists and Capital Account Liberalization in Emerging Markets," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 61(02), pages 443-463, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Christian E. Weller & Ghazal Zulfiqar, 2013. "Financial Market Diversity and Macroeconomic Stability," Working Papers wp332, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

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