IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/sza/wpaper/wpapers119.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The impact of mega-sport events on tourist arrivals

Author

Listed:
  • Johan Fourie

    () (Department of Economics, University of Stellenbosch)

  • María Santana-gallego

    (Department of Economics, La Laguna University, Spain)

Abstract

While a mega-sport event is scheduled at least once every year somewhere in the world, these events are rare occurrences for the host cities and countries. The benefits of such events seem lucrative; the very fact that many countries bid to host these events suggests that the benefits – be they tangible or intangible – more often than not outweigh the costs. Using a standard gravity model of bilateral tourism flows between 200 countries from 1995 to 2006, this paper measures a very direct benefit of such mega-events: the increase in tourist arrivals to the host country. In general, results suggest that mega-events promote tourism but the gain varies depending on the type of mega-event, the participating countries, the host country’s level of development, and whether the event is held during the peak season or off season.

Suggested Citation

  • Johan Fourie & María Santana-gallego, 2010. "The impact of mega-sport events on tourist arrivals," Working Papers 20/2010, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:sza:wpaper:wpapers119
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.ekon.sun.ac.za/wpapers/2010/wp202010/wp-20-2010.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2010
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. James E. Anderson & Eric van Wincoop, 2003. "Gravity with Gravitas: A Solution to the Border Puzzle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(1), pages 170-192, March.
    2. Stefan Szymanski, 2002. "The Economic Impact of the World Cup," World Economics, World Economics, 1 Ivory Square, Plantation Wharf, London, United Kingdom, SW11 3UE, vol. 3(1), pages 169-177, January.
    3. Shiro Armstrong, 2007. "Measuring Trade and Trade Potential: A Survey," Asia Pacific Economic Papers 368, Australia-Japan Research Centre, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    4. Yener Kandogan, 2008. "Consistent Estimates of Regional Blocs' Trade Effects," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 16(2), pages 301-314, May.
    5. Robert Baade & Victor Matheson, 2004. "The Quest for the Cup: Assessing the Economic Impact of the World Cup," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(4), pages 343-354.
    6. Barry Eichengreen & Hui Tong, 2007. "Is China’s FDI Coming at the Expense of Other Countries?," Chapters,in: Foreign Direct Investment in Europe, chapter 11 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    7. Michele FRATIANNI, 2007. "The Gravity Equation in International Trade," Working Papers 307, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
    8. WOLFGANG MAENNIG & STAN du PLESSIS, 2007. "World Cup 2010: South African Economic Perspectives And Policy Challenges Informed By The Experience Of Germany 2006," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 25(4), pages 578-590, October.
    9. Swantje Allmers & Wolfgang Maennig, 2009. "Economic impacts of the FIFA Soccer World Cups in France 1998, Germany 2006, and outlook for South Africa 2010," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 35(4), pages 500-519.
    10. James E. Anderson, 2011. "The Gravity Model," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 3(1), pages 133-160, September.
    11. Stan du Plessis & Wolfgang Maennig, 2007. "World Cup 2010: South African Economic Perspectives and Perspectives Policy Challenges Informed by the Experience of Germany 2006," Working Papers 004, Chair for Economic Policy, University of Hamburg.
    12. Andrew K. Rose & Eric van Wincoop, 2001. "National Money as a Barrier to International Trade: The Real Case for Currency Union," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 386-390, May.
    13. Yair Eilat & Liran Einav, 2004. "Determinants of international tourism: a three-dimensional panel data analysis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(12), pages 1315-1327.
    14. Wolfgang Maennig & Marcel Porsche, 2008. "The Feel-good Effect at Mega Sports Events. Recommendations for Public and Private Administration Informed by the Experience of the FIFA World Cup 2006," Working Papers 018, Chair for Economic Policy, University of Hamburg.
    15. Elhanan Helpman & Marc Melitz & Yona Rubinstein, 2008. "Estimating Trade Flows: Trading Partners and Trading Volumes," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 123(2), pages 441-487.
    16. Head, Keith & Ries, John, 2008. "FDI as an outcome of the market for corporate control: Theory and evidence," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 2-20, January.
    17. David Karemera & Victor Iwuagwu Oguledo & Bobby Davis, 2000. "A gravity model analysis of international migration to North America," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(13), pages 1745-1755.
    18. KÉSENNE, Stefan, "undated". "Do we need an economic impact study or a cost-benefit analysis of a sports event?," Working Papers 2005018, University of Antwerp, Faculty of Applied Economics.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Sport mega-events; tourism; World Cup; Olympic Games; trade;

    JEL classification:

    • L83 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Sports; Gambling; Restaurants; Recreation; Tourism
    • F19 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Other

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:sza:wpaper:wpapers119. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Melt van Schoor). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/desunza.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.