IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/swe/wpaper/2007-22.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Reflections on Australia’s Skilled Migration Policy

Author

Listed:
  • Peter E. Robertson

    () (School of Economics, The University of New South Wales)

Abstract

This paper outlines some recent points of debate over the economic impact of skilled migration on Australia. It is argued that the national gains from an increase in skilled immigration are likely to be small but there are significant effects on income distribution. Recent general equilibrium modeling results are used to show that the skill based immigration programme is a blunt instrument for targeting particular skills needs and may have many potential unintended consequences including the “crowding-out” of higher education in Australia.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter E. Robertson, 2007. "Reflections on Australia’s Skilled Migration Policy," Discussion Papers 2007-22, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
  • Handle: RePEc:swe:wpaper:2007-22
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://wwwdocs.fce.unsw.edu.au/economics/Research/WorkingPapers/2007_22.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. George J. Borjas, 1995. "The Economic Benefits from Immigration," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, pages 3-22.
    2. Meredith Baker & Mark Wooden, 1992. "Immigration and Its Impact on the Incidence of Training in Australia," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 25(2), pages 39-53.
    3. Hamilton, Bob & Whalley, John, 1984. "Efficiency and distributional implications of global restrictions on labour mobility : Calculations and policy implications," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, pages 61-75.
    4. Paul W. Miller, 1999. "Immigration Policy and Immigrant Quality: The Australian Points System," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 192-197.
    5. Clarke, Harry R & Ng, Yew-Kwang, 1993. "Immigration and Economic Welfare: Resource and Environmental Aspects," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 69(206), pages 259-273, September.
    6. James Giesecke & G.A.Meagher, 2006. "Modelling the Economic Impacts of Migration and Population Growth," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers g-157, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.
    7. Bruce Chapman & Glenn Withers, 2002. "Human Capital Accumulation: Education and Immigration," CEPR Discussion Papers 452, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    8. Bhagwati, Jagdish & Hamada, Koichi, 1974. "The brain drain, international integration of markets for professionals and unemployment : A theoretical analysis," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, pages 19-42.
    9. George J. Borjas, 2003. "The Labor Demand Curve is Downward Sloping: Reexamining the Impact of Immigration on the Labor Market," NBER Working Papers 9755, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Walmsley, Terrie L. & Winters, L. Alan, 2005. "Relaxing the Restrictions on the Temporary Movement of Natural Persons: A Simulation Analysis," Journal of Economic Integration, Center for Economic Integration, Sejong University, vol. 20, pages 688-726.
    11. Gang, Ira N & Rivera-Batiz, Francisco L, 1994. "Labor Market Effects of Immigration in the United States and Europe: Substitution vs. Complementarity," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, pages 157-175.
    12. Shea, K. -L. & Woodfield, A. E., 1996. "Optimal immigration, education and growth in the long run," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, pages 495-506.
    13. George J. Borjas, 2003. "The Labor Demand Curve is Downward Sloping: Reexamining the Impact of Immigration on the Labor Market," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 118(4), pages 1335-1374.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Migration; Skilled immigration; Human capital; Education;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:swe:wpaper:2007-22. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Hongyi Li). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/senswau.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.