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Human Capital Accumulation: Education and Immigration

Author

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  • Bruce Chapman
  • Glenn Withers

Abstract

Education and immigration are examined and affirmed as drivers of sustainable productivity growth. In education, individuals see continuing benefits to educational investment, a view supported by individual rates of return from education. Private sector expenditure on education has increased substantially, Australia's public/private funding mix conforming to the OECD average. An expansion of migration is possible without unacceptable reduction in skill composition and may enhance Australian human resources development. The migration program should be set to underpin a 1.25 per cent population growth path and be focussed on 'smart' growth and not just growth in numbers.

Suggested Citation

  • Bruce Chapman & Glenn Withers, 2002. "Human Capital Accumulation: Education and Immigration," CEPR Discussion Papers 452, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  • Handle: RePEc:auu:dpaper:452
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    File URL: https://www.cbe.anu.edu.au/researchpapers/cepr/DP452.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Robert J. Barro, 1991. "Economic Growth in a Cross Section of Countries," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 407-443.
    2. Caroline M. Hoxby, 2000. "Does Competition among Public Schools Benefit Students and Taxpayers?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(5), pages 1209-1238, December.
    3. de Meulemeester, Jean-Luc & Rochat, Denis, 1995. "A causality analysis of the link between higher education and economic development," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 351-361, December.
    4. Glenn Withers, 2000. "Population Issues and Options: Investing in People," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 33(3), pages 265-271.
    5. Schultz, Theodore W, 1975. "The Value of the Ability to Deal with Disequilibria," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 13(3), pages 827-846, September.
    6. Cobb-Clark, D.A. & Connolly, M.D., 1996. "The Worldwide Market for Skilled Migrants: Can Australia Compete?," CEPR Discussion Papers 341, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    7. Hamilton, Bob & Whalley, John, 1984. "Efficiency and distributional implications of global restrictions on labour mobility : Calculations and policy implications," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 61-75.
    8. John M. Quigley, 1998. "Urban Diversity and Economic Growth," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(2), pages 127-138, Spring.
    9. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
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    Blog mentions

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    1. The financial crisis, part II: previous predictions and some new ones.
      by Paul Frijters in Club Troppo on 2008-12-15 11:35:00

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Peter E. Robertson, 2008. "The Biggest Loser: Education and Skilled Immigration in Australia," Agenda - A Journal of Policy Analysis and Reform, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics, vol. 15(1), pages 85-98.
    2. Productivity Commission, 2009. "Restrictions on the Parallel Importation of Books," Research Reports, Productivity Commission, Government of Australia, number 34.
    3. Peter E. Robertson, 2007. "Reflections on Australia’s Skilled Migration Policy," Discussion Papers 2007-22, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
    4. Richard G. Harris & Peter E. Robertson, 2007. "The Dynamic Effects of Skilled Labour Targeting in Immigration Programs," Discussion Papers 2007-21, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.

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