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The Positive Causal Impact of Foreign Direct Investment on Productivity: A Not So Typical Relationship

  • Rodolphe Desbordes

    ()

    (Department of Economics, University of Strathclyde)

  • Vincenzo Verardi

    ()

    (University of Namur (CRED) and Université Libre de Bruxelles (ECARES and CKE).)

Previous research has argued that foreign direct investment (FDI) exerts a positive and causal impact on the productivity of the recipient countries. However, we find that there is little macroeconomic evidence that FDI fosters productivity growth in recipient countries, including in those with high absorptive capacity, once we use an instrumental variables (IV) estimator robust to outliers.

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Paper provided by University of Strathclyde Business School, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 1106.

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Length: 46 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:str:wpaper:1106
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  1. Eswar S. Prasad & Raghuram G. Rajan & Arvind Subramanian, 2007. "Foreign Capital and Economic Growth," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 38(1), pages 153-230.
  2. Caselli, Francesco & Esquivel, Gerardo & Lefort, Fernando, 1996. " Reopening the Convergence Debate: A New Look at Cross-Country Growth Empirics," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 1(3), pages 363-89, September.
  3. Ayhan Kose, M. & Prasad, Eswar S. & Terrones, Marco E., 2009. "Does openness to international financial flows raise productivity growth?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 554-580, June.
  4. Christophe Croux & Geert Dhaene & Dirk Hoorelbeke, 2003. "Robust Standard Errors for Robust Estimators," Center for Economic Studies - Discussion papers ces0316, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Centrum voor Economische Studiën.
  5. Blundell, R. & Bond, S., 1995. "Initial Conditions and Moment Restrictions in Dynamic Panel Data Models," Economics Papers 104, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
  6. Jürgen Bitzer & Holger Görg, 2009. "Foreign Direct Investment, Competition and Industry Performance," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(2), pages 221-233, 02.
  7. Ann E. Harrison & Brian J. Aitken, 1999. "Do Domestic Firms Benefit from Direct Foreign Investment? Evidence from Venezuela," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(3), pages 605-618, June.
  8. M. Ayhan Kose & Kenneth Rogoff & Eswar Prasad & Shang-Jin Wei, 2003. "Effects of Financial Globalization on Developing Countries; Some Empirical Evidence," IMF Occasional Papers 220, International Monetary Fund.
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