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Imputing consumption from Norwegian income and wealth registry data

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Abstract

Data on consumption expenditure of the household is essential in a wide array of economic research. This includes both topics in micro as well as macroeconomics. However, obtaining a consistent and precise measure of household consumption has proven notoriously difficult. This paper documents a method for computing a longitudinal consumption measure for Norwegian households from administrative records of income and wealth. Expenditure surveys tend to suffer from limited sample sizes and underrepresentation of high-income households. Administrative data does not have such limitations and offers a much larger sample with better coverage of all household types. This is particularly useful for improving the measurement of heterogeneity in consumption behavior.

Suggested Citation

  • Andreas Fagereng & Elin Halvorsen, 2015. "Imputing consumption from Norwegian income and wealth registry data," Discussion Papers 831, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:ssb:dispap:831
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    File URL: https://www.ssb.no/en/forskning/discussion-papers/_attachment/249164
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Andreas Fagereng & Martin B. Holm & Gisle J. Natvik, 2016. "MPC heterogeneity and household balance sheets," Discussion Papers 852, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    2. Andreas Fagereng & Luigi Guiso & Luigi Pistaferri, 2017. "Firm-Related Risk and Precautionary Saving Response," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(5), pages 393-397, May.
    3. Serdar Ozkan & Kjetil Storesletten & Hans Holter & Elin Halvorsen, 2017. "The Distributions of Income and Consumption Risk: Evidence from Norwegian Registry Data," 2017 Meeting Papers 1404, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    consumption measurement; savings; household finance;

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions

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