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The Financial Accelerator: Evidence using a procedure of Structural Model Design

We find empirical evidence of a financial accelerator using a data based procedure of Structural Model Design. Credit to firms, asset prices and aggregate economic activity interact over the business cycle in our empirical model of a dynamic economy. Furthermore, the interdependence between credit and asset prices creates a mechanism by which the effects of shocks persist and amplify. However, while innovations to asset prices and credit do cause short-run movements in production, and while real activity spurs credit, such innovations do not precede real economy movements in the long run. Hence, there obviously is a case for Modigliani-Miller in the long run.

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Paper provided by Statistics Norway, Research Department in its series Discussion Papers with number 569.

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Date of creation: Dec 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ssb:dispap:569
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  1. Lown, Cara & Morgan, Donald P., 2004. "The Credit Cycle and the Business Cycle: New Findings Using the Loan Officer Opinion Survey," SIFR Research Report Series 27, Institute for Financial Research.
  2. Q. Farook Akram & Gunnar Bårdsen & Øyvind Eitrheim, 2005. "Monetary policy and asset prices: To respond or not?," Working Paper 2005/9, Norges Bank.
  3. Bardsen, G. & Klovland, J.T., 1998. "Shaken or Stirred? Financial Deregulation and the Monetary Transmission Mechanism in Norway," Papers 32/98, Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration-.
  4. Roger Hammersland, 2008. "Classical identification: A viable road for data to inform structural modeling," Discussion Papers 562, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  5. Beaudry, Paul & Portier, Franck, 2005. "The 'News' View of Economic Fluctuations: Evidence from Aggregate Japanese Data and Sectoral US Data," CEPR Discussion Papers 5176, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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